Collaboration: the future of our NHS- #nurswivesunite

13151090_226356241076122_2131036156_nI write this not to highlight the negatives of our current NHS in crisis, but to address how we can collaboratively work together to save our glorious institution.

I don’t need to talk about our failing health service, I don’t need to talk about the millions of pounds needed from the money tree to keep our beloved institution a float. I don’t need to talk about what the NHS means to Britain and its people, I don’t need to talk about the pressures, the constraints we as healthcare professionals all face.

What we need to talk about is how we can change the future.  I don’t think I’m wrong in saying this is without question the hardest time ever to train to be a nurse or midwife.

We’ve lost our bursary, some of us have lost our passion, our dreams of delivering the care we want to.  Who do we thank for this? Is it a question of politics? Or has our health service just reached a tremendous plateau of increased life expectancy, a rise in population, increased complex care which have become a potent mix given the current economic climate.

How do we adapt?

Collaboration that’s how!

Collaboration– “A purposeful relationship in which all parties strategically choose to cooperate in order to achieve shared or overlapping objectives.”

I love this definition, it epitomises what I believe is at the heart of what we all signed up for; whether you are a student midwife or student nurse we all have overlapping goals, we all CARE.

 We all want to deliver the best care possible whereby it be to a baby on neonatal unit, an Alzheimer’s patient, a child, a patient on a high dependency unit, a labouring woman, they all deserve the same amount of care and compassion.

 We are governed by the code (NMC 2015), we all follow the code, are regulated by the code, we all follow the same overlapping objectives -care, compassion and empathy.

As a whole we are truely invincible.  We have the power to stand up and fight. We have the power to change OUR NHS !!!

Let’s get to know one another, the roles we represent, the care we provide and how we can support each other.  Once we are fully united then I believe we have the power to transform and adapt to the future of our glorious glorious service.

 

Miscarriage & Midwifing

Before continuing to read this please note it may be triggering for those who have experience of baby loss…..please bear this in mind and take care of yourselves before reading further. This is an incredibly personal post so please note all experiences are based on my experience of miscarriage.

I recognize I am a person who processes life events by writing about them. I realized quite soon after my miscarriage that I would need to write about it to help me grieve but now the time has come I don’t really know where to start. I do know I want to reflect on my experience as a student midwife grieving over my lost baby and how I felt/feel.

I started this blog post by doing a quick search for research and other blogs written by midwives who had experienced baby loss but the area is quite sparse. I was surprised by this as midwifery is dominated by women and as miscarriage effects 200,000 couples each year and 1 in 4 pregnancies end in miscarriage (Tommys.org.uk) the chances are a lot of midwives are touched by miscarriage.

I feel like midwives losing babies is a subject not really talked about. Maybe it is discussed among colleagues, friends and peers but my experience is it all feels a little taboo…..like if I talk about it I may be judged as not being able to do my job or might fall apart when taking care of pregnant women….I can’t really verbalise my feelings regarding this other than this was my personal experience of miscarriage as a student midwife. I felt like I needed to just carry on as taking time off may be perceived as a sign of weakness (this is not something I was told by anybody but it was how I felt). This degree is relentless…if I took time off I may never go back so I felt I needed to be ok…to show resilience, put my head down and ‘power through’.

I started my midwifery degree with 3 school age children and felt my family was complete. Both my lovely husband and I were both told, for various reasons, our individual fertility was irreparably damaged so as a couple our chances of conceiving were zilch….which was fine! After a particularly gruelling schedule of placement, exams, essay deadlines, family pressures etc I felt ill…..really ill. More than tired ill and more than stressed ill…I felt dreadful. I have been pregnant 3 times so I recognise the signs. I returned home after my first exam and did a pregnancy test……which was positive!!! I was stunned! Being a StMw (Student Midwife) the first thing I did was calculate my EDD (estimated due date)……our baby was due on our 13th wedding anniversary…..surely this was a sign that the little miracle bean growing inside me was meant to be?

After the shock settled for both me and my husband we started to get excited….this was a door that was firmly closed, bolted, locked and double padlocked! We had been given a chance! I knew the stats….I am 41 for goodness sake! I recited the stats to my husband to try to keep us grounded in the reality that this pregnancy was unlikely to continue but we had got pregnant against the odds so surely I would be ok?!

I went through a whole array of emotions and my thoughts were racing:

I wouldn’t graduate with my cohort which was gutting BUT I would have a much wanted baby…. which was wonderful!

We had no money…..no answer to that really except we would manage!

We are OLD – our youngest is 7 so we would be starting again when all our friends had similar aged children to ours….we didn’t care, we love babies and children!

….and many many more random thoughts…but most of all we were thrilled and, as all couples who are pregnant with a longed for child do, we made plans. We planned when we would tell people, when I would leave uni, when I would return, how I would cope with the pressures of a full on degree when pregnant in my 40’s, who would do my booking as I know all the community midwives in my area? Would people judge us as irresponsible and foolish? The odds of having a healthy baby were not in our favour so would family/ friends/ fellow midwives judge us for getting pregnant especially given all my husband’s health issues and my ever depressing age?! Do you know what?….we didn’t care! We felt so happy and blessed!

I grew our baby for 10 days….10 remarkable, wonderful days when I felt fertile and hopeful and excited. 10 days of hope and dreams and of improving stats (I found an app that showed the likelihood of me miscarrying reducing by the day)…I fell in love.

We were going away for a few days to end my 3 sons’ fortnight holiday from school. I had 2 exams and an essay deadline during this fortnight so the boys had been bribed to tolerate my emotional absence and grumpiness with promises of having 100% mummy for 4 days at the end of their holiday. On the Friday morning we were going away I started to bleed. By Sunday night it was pretty much all over. The hcg line on the pregnancy test had gone from a strong line to a faded line only visible when held up to the light. I was inconsolable and angry….why let me get pregnant for this to happen? I felt my body had let me down. I felt foolish for hoping….this was an incredibly early miscarriage and in a cold, clinical light I could accept that my very efficient body had dealt with a non-viable pregnancy quickly and with little fuss; but this knowledge did little to stop my heart from breaking.

I called my local EPU (early pregnancy unit) on the Monday morning we were leaving our mini break to confirm what I already knew. The very lovely, kind sounding nurse confirmed I was likely miscarrying and informed me to repeat the pregnancy test a week later to ensure all the ‘products of conception’ had gone and to ring immediately if I started to haemorrhage, have severe pain or pass large clots. My pregnancy was all but over. When we returned home I found the pregnancy test with the strong hcg positive line and I sobbed; that proved our baby had been real, albeit momentarily.

I was on placement in the community the next day and was also scheduled to attend a 20 week ultrasound anomaly scan with one of my caseholding couples.

Would I be ok?

Part of me felt silly for being so upset…this was very early (I was about 6 weeks) and people lose babies at all stages of pregnancy how dare I be so upset about such an early loss? But I was…it was the loss of hope and loss of a future we had dreamed of and imagined. The loss of us being parents to 4 children and being a family of 6 ….or more! We had joked it may be twins (my age and a family history of twins increased this possibility).

I was a counsellor before training as a midwife and during my 15 years as a practising counsellor I experienced major personal life traumas but, with increased support from my supervisor I maintained my practice throughout. I know I am able to acknowledge my own feelings whilst also allowing the space within myself to empathise and be present for others in a professional capacity. For this reason I felt I would be okay to attend placement but remain mindful and aware of my own emotions whilst staying grounded in my role as ‘student midwife’. I have always felt it is my role as a professional to empathise not identify. Allow an individual to experience their own situation without inflicting my personal feelings and experience on them.

I sat in the 20 week ultrasound scan with one of my caseholding couples and I was genuinely excited for them. Their baby looked healthy and they were told they were likely having a baby girl. I was thrilled for them and felt emotional and privileged at being able to experience such a lovely, personal moment. I went home after finishing the rest of my shift and felt ok but the poignancy of the situation was not lost on me as I could still feel my body dealing with the loss of my baby.

So what can we do as midwives?

…….Baby loss is a fact of life…the stats prove this. The stats don’t show the women and their partners behind that loss. The stats don’t show how many midwives experience baby loss. The stats don’t give you the tools to manage that loss. I have coping mechanisms thanks to my previous career but I am not made of stone…..what I found hard was not a 20 week ultrasound scan but an 8 week booking appointment when I would have been 8 weeks pregnant and it would have been around the time of my own booking appointment. I didn’t fall apart and I was (I believe) fully present for the couple during that booking appointment but did I go and have a cry on the toilet after it?…. Yes I did.

What needs to change?

……I am not sure……more talking amongst midwives of their own experiences of baby loss (hence this blog…..very few people knew I was pregnant so I feel quite exposed writing this but I am trying, in my own small way, to challenge the perceived taboo) and an acknowledgement that miscarriages, even very early ones like mine, leave a footprint. Our wedding anniversary will come and go and we will acknowledge our baby existed for however short that amount of time was.

Miscarriage is discussed in a very clinical way with terms like ‘products of conception’, ’tissue’ and ‘chemical pregnancy’ but I needed to talk about my ‘baby’ and ‘hope’. I needed to talk about how I felt about my 3 beautiful sons not having the chance to meet their baby brother or sister. I needed to sob & sob and not feel guilty for crying over somebody who only existed for a short space of time. I am not a Christian or a particularly spiritual person but our baby existed to me & my husband and we need time to be sad. My husband was quite pragmatic until we did the final (negative) pregnancy test …until that point he must have been carrying some hope (I was not; the test for me was a relief that my body had dealt with everything and I didn’t need to go to hospital and have any medical procedures) and he cried. I was shocked…..I am embarrassed that I was shocked as I feel like I should know better but I was genuinely surprised he was so upset. Fathers need acknowledgement within baby loss too and they tend to grieve differently. My experience as a counsellor is it seems to take longer for men to acknowledge loss and therefore grieve. This is worth bearing in mind when supporting families with loss.

If you are working with women and their partners following baby loss, please acknowledge the loss; acknowledge the sadness and grief. Being told “well it was very early” is unhelpful as it undermines a couple’s grief, we needed permission to be sad not platitudes in an aim to ‘cheer us up’.  Being told “well at least you can get pregnant” is also unhelpful as that does not acknowledge the loss of this pregnancy and this baby which is what we were experiencing. What helped me was my amazing trio of fellow Student Midwives who were my friends. They were not clinical or ‘midwifey’ they were my friends and gave me permission to grieve.

Thank you for reading.

 

 

ATTENTION FIRST YEAR STUDENT MIDWIVES… Your PAD, White book and signatures!

I APOLOGISE AS THIS IS LONG…STICK WITH IT….. IT’S IMPORTANT INFORMATION;-)

Ok…you first years are all starting to think about placement right? It’s about a month away for the student midwives so your uniforms will be arriving shortly if you don’t already have them and you will have your documentation staring out of wherever you have hidden it because, if you’re anything like me, the thought of even starting to read that huge PAD document thing on top of all the studying you have to do is so out of the question it’s unbelievable!

Well I am here to hopefully hold your virtual hand through the whole documentation experience and share my many mistakes so you don’t make them!

First of all let’s clarify the difference between your

pad

 

PAD (Practice Assessment Document)……

 

 

 

 

white-book

 

 

……..and your white book (Record of Statutory Clinical Midwifery Experience).

 

 

 

 

 

You may not believe this but it took me a good couple of months to work out who can sign what and how equally important but different these two documents are!

 

So I’ll start with what I think is the easier one-the White Book. This will be held by you for the full 3 years then handed in at the end of your degree. Your AA will look through this during your individual meetings just to make sure you are ‘on track’.

The White book is where you record your statutory skills which every student midwife at every university will have to get signed off before they can qualify. You have the space in here to log your 40 births which seems to be the area of focus for a lot of students but there are A LOT more skills you need to achieve as well as delivering babies. For example, you need to record evidence of  antenatal examinations & care of 100 pregnant women and examinations & care of 100 postnatal women and their newborn babies.

In these midwifery areas any qualified midwife can sign off your evidence. They DO NOT need to be a mentor/sign off mentor. This is important because you will work with a lot of midwives when on placement and you may carry out a beautiful abdominal palpation and listen to the fetal heartbeat with a pinard whilst your mentor is on a break and you are working with another midwife…..WRITE IT IN YOUR WHITE BOOK AND GET IT SIGNED OFF! The white book just needs the woman’s hospital number, the date, what you did and the midwife’s signature. It can be written up in a couple of minutes and signed there and then! Otherwise you will get home, not written down half the hospital numbers for the women you have worked with that day, for the ones you have written down you’ll have forgotten what parity the woman was or the pregnancy gestation and for the ones you can remember you will realize the midwife who you worked with is now on maternity leave and so won’t be around to sign that evidence off (YES…ALL these have happened to me!!!-it’s gutting!).

There’s areas of the white book which can be signed off by qualified Healthcare professionals who work in other areas i.e. neonatal staff  or breastfeeding support  workers but the important thing to get into your heads about the white book is…

ANY QUALIFIED HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL CAN SIGN YOUR EVIDENCE FOR THE RELEVANT AREA YOU WERE IN WHEN YOU COMPLETED THE SKILL

AND

GET IT SIGNED THERE & THEN!

 

OKAY…..big, deep, breath…..THE PAD! Unlike the white book your PAD skills and interviews get handed in at the end of each academic year but you keep the folder (mine is already wrecked!). Your PAD skills are handed in through an official process where you are given a deadline (date & time) and you complete a front sheet for each set of skills and hand them into an exams officer (I point this out because this process was much more official than I expected it to be and it unnerved me a bit!). Your AA will probably take your interviews but this does depend  on the AA; I still have my complete set of first year interviews but I know a lot of my cohort have handed theirs in.

Signing stuff- this is a bit trickier than the white book as the people who can sign your skills off are limited. Let’s just talk about the actual documentation as an opener……..

Interviews

Ideally, at the start, mid point and end of each placement you and your mentor need to sit down and do your interviews. These will be read and checked at your AA meetings and are important for all parties involved as they help you assess where you are up to and also help you gather your thoughts on whether you are getting what you need out of the placement and if not how you can be proactive in accessing more opportunities.

During your mid placement interview do not forget to get your mentor to sign the actual interview AND the mid placement interview section on the front sheet of the set of skills you are working on (i.e. in the community this may be ‘Midwifery Care Pregnancy & birth antenatal skills’ section of your PAD. If your mentor has students from different universities they may not be familiar with UoM paperwork as every uni is different so its your responsibility to ensure every thing is completed.

As an aside, I did not realize our skills directly related to the academic units we were doing until about 6 months in…..don’t judge me I was overwhelmed!!!

Also you will have your progression points at week 19 & week 52….these tend to coincide with final placement interviews but not always so stay on top of these dates….get them in your diaries as both your mentor and AA need to write comments and sign these.

Skills

The skills section of your PAD is divided into 4 sections. Familiarise yourself with the sections, notice which sections coincide with your academic units so you can use what you are learning in university to inform your practice and vice versa, then write them up! Sounds obvious but it isn’t always! For example, if you have been learning about abdominal palpation in university and you are out on practice in the community, tell your mentor you have had a session on abdominal palpation and the use of pinards. Let your mentor know that you would really like to practice this in clinical placement. Your mentor will support you in this (if the opportunity arises) then you can write this skill up using all the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills you gained then get your mentor to sign this skill off! This, I recognise, is an ideal world scenario but this is YOUR clinical placement….make it work for you. This is your opportunity to apply what you are learning in theory to your practice; it is NOT your mentors responsibility to work out which skills you need to practice and get signed off!

Mentor/sign off mentor/SIGNATURES

You will be assigned a mentor when you go on placement for every clinical area you will be working in. You need to find out if they are a sign off mentor (they are usually quite forthcoming with this information!). Only sign off mentors can sign your paperwork and assign you a grade. If your mentor is not a sign off mentor ensure you know who the sign off mentors are in that clinical area and try and work at least a couple of shifts with them. Your mentor can sign your skills but the sign off  mentor needs to countersign them. THIS IS NOT THE SAME AS YOUR WHITE BOOK ! So if your mentor signs off that you are amazing at communicating with women the sign off mentor needs to countersign and date this skill as well.

I am going to **star** and bold and italic this next sentence because this caught me out on my placement and meant I spent most of my last shift at my first year trust running around trying to find one member of staff and ringing my AA almost in tears……..

******AS SOON AS ANYONE SIGNS YOUR SKILLS IN YOUR PAD MAKE SURE THEY SIGN THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE SHEET FOR EACH SET OF SKILLS THEY HAVE SIGNED AND WRITES DOWN WHEN THEY LAST HAD A MENTOR UPDATE******

(i.e. if a sign off mentor countersigns a skill in the ‘intrapartum care’ section of your PAD and the ‘tackling health inequalities’ section of your PAD, THEY NEED TO SIGN THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE FOR EACH SET OF SKILLS.

Imagine the scenario….you are finishing a night shift on the midwifery-led birth centre and the midwife you worked with observed you support a couple during a lovely labour & delivery. You had the opportunity to write up the skills you demonstrated during this shift and you got your midwife mentor to sign these skills off and she quickly got the sign off mentor, who’d just come on an early shift to countersign them before both you and your mentor floated off home to sleep…… WITHOUT GETTING THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE SHEET SIGNED BY THE SIGN OFF MENTOR!!! YOU NEED TO GET THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE SHEET SIGNED (yes this is what happened to me!!!) If you don’t, as a first year your PAD will be referred and you will have to return to your old trust to track down the sign off mentor to sign the sample signature sheet and then resubmit the whole skill set. If you do not have all the signatures completed on the sample signature sheet in second and third year YOU WILL FAIL (this makes me feel sick!).

Another starred, bold, italic section coming up……………………….

****YOU NEED TO DATE EVERYTHING YOU SIGN****

A LOT of my cohort got our PAD skills returned to us because we hadn’t dated our signatures on our skills documents! We had ensured our mentors had dated everything but we actually hadn’t! There is no ‘date’ prompt next to the student signature section but you do need to date it! I cannot begin to tell you what a complete pain in the rear it is when you have finally tracked down the sign off mentor to sign your sample signature sheet, hobbled, exhausted and emotional to hand in the PAD documentation hoping you never have to see it again, only to get it ALL handed back as ALL my signatures needed dating! Literally, every single one of the 60 or so skills I needed to go through and date! DATE THEM!!! Believe me you will not want that PAD handed back to you! If you aren’t sure if something needs dating and signing do it anyway! I am very much ‘better to be safe than sorry’ …once bitten and all that!!!

Think that’s all the terrible tales I need to pass on about documentation!! I do wonder how I managed to even get on this degree as reading back over this makes me look a bit lacking but I blame sleep deprivation!

You will be getting your uniforms soon-empty all pockets before you take it off and buy a tub of vanish….white is a TERRIBLE colour! What were they thinking giving nervous, tired students white?!! One night shift my pen had leaked in my pocket and because I was on an antenatal ward and the women were sleeping, all the lights were dimmed ….by the time I realised my pen had leaked I had fingerprints on my uniform, on some lovely white sheets, on a couple of CTG monitors and on my face!

uniform I was very glad I had purchased a tub of vanish big enough to bath a baby in!

Good luck and DATE EVERYTHING!!!!

 

`

 

 

 

What a difference a year makes…..a message to those starting uni in September

This time last year I was 2 weeks away from packing up my beautiful little counselling room and walking away from a career which I had worked in, enjoyed and become competent in for 15 years and I COULDN’T WAIT!

office-1Don’t get me wrong I loved….LOVED being a therapist and in some ways it defined me but I had pondered long and hard about the decision to change careers and it had been an exhausting slog getting to the stage where I felt confident to finally end my practice and leap into this new world of placements, essays, exams, university life, uniforms, night shifts, long days, hospitals, babies, women, families, doctors, midwives, HCAs, colleagues, blood, faeces, vomit, paperwork, paperwork, paperwork and STRESS but I was ready I WAS READY TO GO …or at least I thought I was!

What would I say to me this time last year:

“read everything you want to read which isn’t midwifery related because in a year you will feel guilty every time you pick up a non-midwifery related magazine/book”

“knit what you need to knit, sew that skirt and dress you’ve been desperate to get on with and RUN for hours in the evening when the kids are in bed whilst you still can as that time will swiftly become ‘study time'”

“play with your sons, read with your sons, cwtch them at bedtime and in the mornings before school because these are times you won’t be around for and you will be intoxicated with guilt for all the times you could’ve done this and didn’t. Enjoy taking them to school and picking them up as this will soon become a treat not a chore”

“go and visit your parents and explain to them that the next three years are going to be tough and you will work weekends and when you aren’t working weekends you will be studying over weekends as you have worked all week and yes, this is dreadful as dementia is slowly taking your dad away but drink him in now, absorb him and how he is in 2015 as 2016 will bring a bit less of him”

“go out with your husband-he’s a good, decent man and over the next 12 months he is going to prove time and time again that he can and will step up and be both parents to your sons and keep the kids fed, the house clean, the washing basket empty and the animals fed and you sane(ish) despite you doubting his ability to do any of these things at this moment in time”

“invest in the right people. You have amazing friends in your life, some will still be around this time next year and some won’t-friendships have seasons but you will meet the MOST amazing friends on this course and, along with a couple of decent friends already in your life, they will hold you and wipe your tears and tell you that you can do this despite you truly believing, in your soul, you have made a massive mistake. The friends you make over the next couple of months will be your ticket to making it through the next 3 years and hopefully the rest of your career because your midwife sisters are the ONLYpeople who truly understand what it takes to make it through this career choice. It is HARD but MY GOD it’s worth it”

“and most of all EMBRACE every opportunity….you are going to be scared at times, really scared; you’ve been really scared in your life before and you’ve managed to get through it but this will be a different fear; this is a fear of failure, a fear of actually causing harm because you don’t know what you’re doing, a fear or letting your family down, a fear of letting yourself down but don’t let the fear get in the way of being in the moment and experiencing every opportunity that comes your way because this job you are training for, this career, this vocation is a gift and a privilege and NOTHING that precious comes without a price”

Would I have heeded any of this advice….NAH! I was too excited but it’s nice to look back on and reflect!

To those about to start university-yes you’ll have doubts and you will probably cry and wonder if you’ve done the right thing at points over the next 12 months (& beyond I would guess!) but always force yourself to go and do your next shift as you just never know what might happen on that shift that confirms you’ve done the right thing! Plus-if you need support its there don’t be alone in your worry.

 

Student midwife information services-From an educational and practical perspective

I seem to live, breath, eat and sleep midwifery!  Last thing before bed and the first thing I do in the morning is read the latest updates from Elsevier, Midwifery Journal, RCM, MIDIRS the list goes on!!!

Sleeping_while_studying

No amount of reading can ever be enough as a STMW.  As students we are adult learners, responsible for our own learning, expected to keep up to date with current research, information and clinical guidance.  There is so much to midwifery, I never truly appreciated the enormity of my vocation before starting my journey.

Information services are invaluable for our learning.   I am subscribed to many different learning tools and organisations.  One information service I find particularity invaluable is MIDIRS.

midirs

‘Our Mission:
To be the leading international information resource relating to childbirth and infancy, disseminating this information as widely as possible to assist in the improvement of maternity care’ (MIDIRS 2016)

MIDIRS is an information and resource service for midwives and student midwives, keeping in touch with the latest up to date midwifery knowledge and research, hot topics and articles in midwifery as well as having an in-depth database of research.

‘MIDIRS – or the Midwives Information and Resource Service – is a not-for-profit educational charity providing effective information resources that help maternity health care professionals or students succeed in their professional development and studies.’ (MIDIRS 2016)

Publishing a journal/digest quarterly of the latest research studies and news so you can always rely on the fact the information in the journal is current and reliable information you can use in your studies.

Upon starting my degree I went out and bought umpteen midwifery textbooks, although my course requires me to use this literature, journal and database use is seen as extremely favourable by the university as it shows initiative, breadth and depth of knowledge and passion.  I strongly recommend any midwifery student or nursing student to use current databases and journals to keep up to date with your subject area, I find these invaluable to my practice, learning outcomes and knowledge as a STMW.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call the Midwife- I need a pinard!!!

Pinard’s- Funny horn like instruments that remind me of a trumpet.

Pinard’s- what are they? Pinard’s- why call it that?

These are the questions I first asked myself as a fresh 1st year shuffling through my clinical skills book. They want evidence of antenatal assessment using a PINARD!! 😇

Once I got into antenatal clinic I was introduced to the pinard, ahhhhhh I thought…. Call the midwife!!!! I reminisced back to the series, scenes of the nuns and midwives using these funny shaped horns , pressing into a woman’s bump to hear the baby’s heart beat. Ohhhh!!!!  So what is a pinard and how does it work?

The pinard was once called a fetostethoscope, before the days of the doppler or sonic-aid, midwives would use the pinard to listen for the FH- fetal heart. It was named a “pinard” after French obstetrician Adolphe Pinard.  A pioneer in perinatal and antenatal care, he specialisesed in palpation and fetal activity. In 1895 he invented the “pinard”.

I love the pinard- I see it as a right of passage, an essential authentic midwifery tool that has been replaced by technology.

 

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It amazes me how the midwives of the past used these simple yet effective stethoscopes to keep track of fetal development.

Nothing beats the feeling of actually finding the heart beat of a baby in clinic, I adore discovering the fetal position, listening to the fetal heart and with technological advancements women are now able to hear their baby’s heart too, the sound of a fetal heart is so soothing and it is lovely to see the women comforted by their babies ‘thud thuds’.

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I do however wish the pinard was used as frequently as a sonic-aid, it is a piece of midwifery history that I believe is just as important.  I took my pinard-

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(My pretty pink pinard!! 🙂

to antenatal clinic this week, determined to practice the art!!  When I heard a beautiful beat I was elated!!!  Safe to say I will be taking my pretty pink pinard with me on placement next week, determined to keep this historical practice part of my future practice.

I recommend visiting Sara Wickhams blog about pinard use, Pinard Wisdom – Tips and Tricks from Midwives (Part 1), fascinating read into pinard use.

 

 

International day of the Midwife-“changing the world, one family at a time”

International day of the midwife- blog PIC

Last Thursday, May 5th, was the International Day of the Midwife.  First established in 1992, each year on the 5th May the International Confederation of Midwives asks the world to focus on the role of midwives and midwifery.  Every year there is a different campaign theme. It is a day for every individual midwife to think about others in the profession,  make new contacts within and outside midwifery, helping to widen the worlds knowledge of what the role of the midwife is and how it fits into the today’s world. The constant overarching theme is “The World Needs Midwives Today More Than Ever” (ICM2016) this is part of an ongoing campaign to highlight the need for midwives, reflecting on the World Health Organisations call for more midwives globally.

IDM_feature_620x280_tagline

This year the focus was on  ‘ women and newborns’.  ” Midwives around the world work hard every day to ensure women and newborns receive the quality care that they deserve.” (ICM 2016)

Midwives globally were encouraged to share a photo and a statement on social media ( #IDM2016) of what there role is and how it in corporates the above ethos in daily practice.  The RCM encouraged the use of social media, local seminars, study days to promote locally the meaning of IDM.

http://www.internationalmidwives.org/events/

The above link takes you to the International Confederation of Midwives events page.  There are some exciting and informative gatherings happening across the globe over the next couple months following on from this years theme.

It is so important to celebrate IDM, to remind ourselves of the challenges other countries face, to celebrate what we can learn from each and how we can improve midwifery care globally.