You’re a Qualified Nurse!

Congratulations!! 

You have graduated! You are now a qualified nurse! 

Yes those three years that felt very long at times have flown by and you’ve passed your last multiple choice exam and written your last essay and possibly lost the will to live writing your dissertation out.

And if you’re fortunate enough you’ve got a new job starting very soon or maybe you’ve already started.

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Again, those differences with your peers stand out as some take to being an employed qualified nurse like a duck to water… others are petrified still. The thought of being responsible and held accountable for all your actions and everything that happens to your patients!?! We are all different remember and every trust and team are different and work in different ways

You should be on a preceptorship in your new role which allows you to settle in. You should build up at your own pace your confidence in the role you now have. Your workload should be lighter than your work peers and you should have a preceptor to support you through.

There should be contacts and time available in your shift/daily routine to allow you to reflect and give you time to learn all about your specific responsibilities and how the other teams around you work to support your patient on their journey.

As with being a student nurse – don’t be afraid to ask, no question is daft. Make sure your team know your strengths and your weaknesses so they can support you effectively. Use your preceptorship time as an opportunity to explore other departments, you should be allowed time to learn from them to – a bit like spokes still but with a more focused view and outcomes set.

Change can be good but sometimes things don’t always go to plan. You may find yourself not enjoying your new role as much as you’d thought or you may find something new you didn’t know existed out there. Be honest with yourself and seek support from your preceptor. People do move jobs in their first 12 months. It’s better for you and your patients if you a comfortable in your role.

Supervision should be part and parcel of your nursing role giving you a chance to discuss events or patients that you need support with or after. Some places will offer peer support sessions too where you can discuss thoughts and experiences with people in a similar position as yourself. Try and keep preceptorship time separate from this, preceptorship is about you and your learning not your caseload specifics. Every work place will have various tasks, limits and time frames on preceptorships, so don’t worry if others are getting signed off and you’re not. Take your time and make the most it… trust me!

Remember your portfolio? Certificates and reflections etc, keep it up. Use your skills to carry on and show your lifelong learning. It will make revalidation so much easier when your time come, one thing us new nurses have the advantage of now.

Being a newly qualified is far from easy but remember this is just the start of a new journey, keep your eyes and ears open, don’t forget to ask, question and don’t be afraid to suggest new ideas too – remember you are fresh from university with perhaps a more update focus, a new pair of eyes etc.

Continue to strive for the best for your patients and yourself!

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You’re a Qualified Nurse!

Congratulations!! 

You have graduated! You are now a qualified nurse! 

Yes those three years that felt very long at times have flown by and you’ve passed your last multiple choice exam and written your last essay and possibly lost the will to live writing your dissertation out.

And if you’re fortunate enough you’ve got a new job starting very soon or maybe you’ve already started.

Image result for omg

Again, those differences with your peers stand out as some take to being an employed qualified nurse like a duck to water… others are petrified still. The thought of being responsible and held accountable for all your actions and everything that happens to your patients!?! We are all different remember and every trust and team are different and work in different ways

You should be on a preceptorship in your new role which allows you to settle in. You should build up at your own pace your confidence in the role you now have. Your workload should be lighter than your work peers and you should have a preceptor to support you through.

There should be contacts and time available in your shift/daily routine to allow you to reflect and give you time to learn all about your specific responsibilities and how the other teams around you work to support your patient on their journey.

As with being a student nurse – don’t be afraid to ask, no question is daft. Make sure your team know your strengths and your weaknesses so they can support you effectively. Use your preceptorship time as an opportunity to explore other departments, you should be allowed time to learn from them to – a bit like spokes still but with a more focused view and outcomes set.

Change can be good but sometimes things don’t always go to plan. You may find yourself not enjoying your new role as much as you’d thought or you may find something new you didn’t know existed out there. Be honest with yourself and seek support from your preceptor. People do move jobs in their first 12 months. It’s better for you and your patients if you a comfortable in your role.

Supervision should be part and parcel of your nursing role giving you a chance to discuss events or patients that you need support with or after. Some places will offer peer support sessions too where you can discuss thoughts and experiences with people in a similar position as yourself. Try and keep preceptorship time separate from this, preceptorship is about you and your learning not your caseload specifics. Every work place will have various tasks, limits and time frames on preceptorships, so don’t worry if others are getting signed off and you’re not. Take your time and make the most it… trust me!

Remember your portfolio? Certificates and reflections etc, keep it up. Use your skills to carry on and show your lifelong learning. It will make revalidation so much easier when your time come, one thing us new nurses have the advantage of now.

Being a newly qualified is far from easy but remember this is just the start of a new journey, keep your eyes and ears open, don’t forget to ask, question and don’t be afraid to suggest new ideas too – remember you are fresh from university with perhaps a more update focus, a new pair of eyes etc.

Continue to strive for the best for your patients and yourself!

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I’m a Newly Qualified Nurse! OMG!

So Now What?!?

For me? Well I  did it!!– I’ve qualified – Passed all my exams PADs all signed off.

I’m even lucky enough to have myself a job!! EEK!!

Wow! Looking back what an amazing three years at uni I’ve had. Its such a blur in regards of what I’ve learnt but such a feeling to say I’ve done it. Its had its ups and downs but looking back I know they have all helped me get where I am today – In my first job as a qualified nurse! WOW again! staff-nurse

So was it worth it – am I fully prepared for my job?? Yes and No would be my answer to that.

No – because is anyone ever ready and fully prepared for a job you barely know? Of course not!

Yes – because – well actually I’ve surprised myself how much I do actually know and how much I do actually remember! Even those first year lectures are still stored in my upstairs somewhere and come back to me when I need them. Yes of course I am talking at a very basic knowledge level here but recognising and accepting I am at the bottom rung again knowledge wise in my role is the best way to be. I’m very luck in that I have a great team around me who are supporting and encouraging my continuing learning in my chosen field because that’s what Its like – starting all over again but this time you are doing all the work, you are making those decisions (with support), you are a nurse!

Its an amazing feeling – and responsibility rolled into one.responsibility

So then there is this thing called Preceptorship – Some department areas it seems are more organised than others in how it all works and fits around new starters. The key to remember is we are all different, jobs and departments are different; just like it is in placements. Don’t compare what you are getting too much with others. Your preceptorship should suit your needs as well as the job you have.

Little information was provided to us about what happens once it’s all over and you enter the ‘real world of nursing’ but as we all know – everything is changing all the time, things are rarely the same twice.

In university, as previous students, we input our voice on things we felt were good, bad or ugly. We did our best to change things for future students. The same is to be said in healthcare as a profession. Everything is continuously assessed, evaluated and changed where necessary, to achieve the best standards for all those involved, workers and patients alike. So get used to it – it will happen.

Qualified life so far is scary but awesome. I feel like a student still in someways but when I make those important care plan decisions myself, I know my training has paid off and I am confident in my judgement. Expect the unexpected and believe in yourself and you got this!! smile

p.s. Pay the NMC as soon as you get your pin number through from uni ! It can be done online straightaway so start saving now!

Advice from a Newly Qualified Nurse

Today I am delighted to bring you some advice from a newly qualified nurse, who also graduated from The University of Manchester

To all my fellow nursing students… the toughest students around! I have recently qualified as a staff nurse in October (scary right ) and currently work on a diabetic specialist ward- the first job I applied for as I went through general trust recruitment and would recommend this to any of you who aren’t sure what area you would like to work I in yet. I thought I would pass on my experience as a Manchester student and as a newly qualified staff nurse 🙂

First of all I am going to bullet point any learning experiences or notes I have for all of you rather than put it in a long winded paragraph as frankly we all have to read enough rambling on of other people whilst at uni, especially if you are currently writing your dissertation, you may never want to read again!

Student Life: -Don’t give up!

1-It is a very hard but very rewarding career. At times I felt like quitting with the stress of placement, uni work and trying to hold down a part time job. You are all doing so well to have made it this far, and we are all here to help and support you. On a side note please ignore all the nurses on placement who say:”why on earth have you picked to do nursing ” or my favourite ” oo you should have been a doctor, that’s much better money”.

2-In reference to part time work – I worked at a roster aunt long hours at weekend for my first and second years and it was just too much ! I would advise to join nhsp as a HCA as soon as you have done 6 weeks in a hospital setting . If like me nhsp keeps crashing for you and is taking 6 months to get an interview consider agency HCA who I joined with for my last year – if anyone wants any information on that I will leave my email 🙂

3-Do your work in plenty of time ! Especially your dissertation, I left mine till the last minute and boy was it stressful . Also a tip for assignments, the reference app thing on Microsoft word is very good.

4-If you are a complete newbie, invest in comfy shoes,your feet will ache after long shifts on your feet all day and please don’t wash your tunic and pants together, they go a very odd colour haha.

5- whilst on placement attend all of the training sessions you can by booking onto them at the education centre, they make up your hours which is good, especially if you aren’t to keen on your placement. I also found it handy to carry a small notepad in my pocket to jot useful things down whilst on placement.

Moving on… Newly qualified:

1- I am not going to lie, it is scary as anything when you first qualify, when someone shouts nurse, you look down and it’s you ! It is normal to doubt your capabilities, question if your cut out for this or why on earth have I decided to do this? ITS OK & VERY VERY NORMAL. Every nurse you see on the ward has all been there , you are going from little to full blown responsibly and that’s scary however the nurses in my experience are all so supportive and understanding. They know you are new to the job and don’t expect as soon as your graduation cap comes off , super nurse to bound through the doors, and any nurse who tries to put you down for not knowing something because your newly qualified, shame on them , no one knows everything there ever is to know about nursing and on a side note, revaluation is coming around, we have had 3 years worth of cross referencing and reflection for our portfolios, so the tables will soon turn 🙂 I would recommend getting a job where there is a preceptorship programme as that’s what I wish I had done differently.

2- Stand your ground: if there is something you are not sure of or not happy with, just ask or even question a doctor as to why he’s doing such a thing, no one is going to think your stupid and you would rather be safe than sorry (we all make mistakes, even doctors!) At the end of the day no one can make you do anything you don’t want to, it’s your pin on the line. Have confidence in your own judgement , most of the time you will be right 🙂

Good luck in your training , which ever stage you may be in, you will all make fantastic nurses and hope to work with you in the future.

If anyone has any questions they would like to ask about anything this is my emailracheljanemoore@hotmail.com

All the best , keep up the good work:)

Rach