ATTENTION FIRST YEAR STUDENT MIDWIVES… Your PAD, White book and signatures!

I APOLOGISE AS THIS IS LONG…STICK WITH IT….. IT’S IMPORTANT INFORMATION;-)

Ok…you first years are all starting to think about placement right? It’s about a month away for the student midwives so your uniforms will be arriving shortly if you don’t already have them and you will have your documentation staring out of wherever you have hidden it because, if you’re anything like me, the thought of even starting to read that huge PAD document thing on top of all the studying you have to do is so out of the question it’s unbelievable!

Well I am here to hopefully hold your virtual hand through the whole documentation experience and share my many mistakes so you don’t make them!

First of all let’s clarify the difference between your

pad

 

PAD (Practice Assessment Document)……

 

 

 

 

white-book

 

 

……..and your white book (Record of Statutory Clinical Midwifery Experience).

 

 

 

 

 

You may not believe this but it took me a good couple of months to work out who can sign what and how equally important but different these two documents are!

 

So I’ll start with what I think is the easier one-the White Book. This will be held by you for the full 3 years then handed in at the end of your degree. Your AA will look through this during your individual meetings just to make sure you are ‘on track’.

The White book is where you record your statutory skills which every student midwife at every university will have to get signed off before they can qualify. You have the space in here to log your 40 births which seems to be the area of focus for a lot of students but there are A LOT more skills you need to achieve as well as delivering babies. For example, you need to record evidence of  antenatal examinations & care of 100 pregnant women and examinations & care of 100 postnatal women and their newborn babies.

In these midwifery areas any qualified midwife can sign off your evidence. They DO NOT need to be a mentor/sign off mentor. This is important because you will work with a lot of midwives when on placement and you may carry out a beautiful abdominal palpation and listen to the fetal heartbeat with a pinard whilst your mentor is on a break and you are working with another midwife…..WRITE IT IN YOUR WHITE BOOK AND GET IT SIGNED OFF! The white book just needs the woman’s hospital number, the date, what you did and the midwife’s signature. It can be written up in a couple of minutes and signed there and then! Otherwise you will get home, not written down half the hospital numbers for the women you have worked with that day, for the ones you have written down you’ll have forgotten what parity the woman was or the pregnancy gestation and for the ones you can remember you will realize the midwife who you worked with is now on maternity leave and so won’t be around to sign that evidence off (YES…ALL these have happened to me!!!-it’s gutting!).

There’s areas of the white book which can be signed off by qualified Healthcare professionals who work in other areas i.e. neonatal staff  or breastfeeding support  workers but the important thing to get into your heads about the white book is…

ANY QUALIFIED HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL CAN SIGN YOUR EVIDENCE FOR THE RELEVANT AREA YOU WERE IN WHEN YOU COMPLETED THE SKILL

AND

GET IT SIGNED THERE & THEN!

 

OKAY…..big, deep, breath…..THE PAD! Unlike the white book your PAD skills and interviews get handed in at the end of each academic year but you keep the folder (mine is already wrecked!). Your PAD skills are handed in through an official process where you are given a deadline (date & time) and you complete a front sheet for each set of skills and hand them into an exams officer (I point this out because this process was much more official than I expected it to be and it unnerved me a bit!). Your AA will probably take your interviews but this does depend  on the AA; I still have my complete set of first year interviews but I know a lot of my cohort have handed theirs in.

Signing stuff- this is a bit trickier than the white book as the people who can sign your skills off are limited. Let’s just talk about the actual documentation as an opener……..

Interviews

Ideally, at the start, mid point and end of each placement you and your mentor need to sit down and do your interviews. These will be read and checked at your AA meetings and are important for all parties involved as they help you assess where you are up to and also help you gather your thoughts on whether you are getting what you need out of the placement and if not how you can be proactive in accessing more opportunities.

During your mid placement interview do not forget to get your mentor to sign the actual interview AND the mid placement interview section on the front sheet of the set of skills you are working on (i.e. in the community this may be ‘Midwifery Care Pregnancy & birth antenatal skills’ section of your PAD. If your mentor has students from different universities they may not be familiar with UoM paperwork as every uni is different so its your responsibility to ensure every thing is completed.

As an aside, I did not realize our skills directly related to the academic units we were doing until about 6 months in…..don’t judge me I was overwhelmed!!!

Also you will have your progression points at week 19 & week 52….these tend to coincide with final placement interviews but not always so stay on top of these dates….get them in your diaries as both your mentor and AA need to write comments and sign these.

Skills

The skills section of your PAD is divided into 4 sections. Familiarise yourself with the sections, notice which sections coincide with your academic units so you can use what you are learning in university to inform your practice and vice versa, then write them up! Sounds obvious but it isn’t always! For example, if you have been learning about abdominal palpation in university and you are out on practice in the community, tell your mentor you have had a session on abdominal palpation and the use of pinards. Let your mentor know that you would really like to practice this in clinical placement. Your mentor will support you in this (if the opportunity arises) then you can write this skill up using all the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills you gained then get your mentor to sign this skill off! This, I recognise, is an ideal world scenario but this is YOUR clinical placement….make it work for you. This is your opportunity to apply what you are learning in theory to your practice; it is NOT your mentors responsibility to work out which skills you need to practice and get signed off!

Mentor/sign off mentor/SIGNATURES

You will be assigned a mentor when you go on placement for every clinical area you will be working in. You need to find out if they are a sign off mentor (they are usually quite forthcoming with this information!). Only sign off mentors can sign your paperwork and assign you a grade. If your mentor is not a sign off mentor ensure you know who the sign off mentors are in that clinical area and try and work at least a couple of shifts with them. Your mentor can sign your skills but the sign off  mentor needs to countersign them. THIS IS NOT THE SAME AS YOUR WHITE BOOK ! So if your mentor signs off that you are amazing at communicating with women the sign off mentor needs to countersign and date this skill as well.

I am going to **star** and bold and italic this next sentence because this caught me out on my placement and meant I spent most of my last shift at my first year trust running around trying to find one member of staff and ringing my AA almost in tears……..

******AS SOON AS ANYONE SIGNS YOUR SKILLS IN YOUR PAD MAKE SURE THEY SIGN THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE SHEET FOR EACH SET OF SKILLS THEY HAVE SIGNED AND WRITES DOWN WHEN THEY LAST HAD A MENTOR UPDATE******

(i.e. if a sign off mentor countersigns a skill in the ‘intrapartum care’ section of your PAD and the ‘tackling health inequalities’ section of your PAD, THEY NEED TO SIGN THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE FOR EACH SET OF SKILLS.

Imagine the scenario….you are finishing a night shift on the midwifery-led birth centre and the midwife you worked with observed you support a couple during a lovely labour & delivery. You had the opportunity to write up the skills you demonstrated during this shift and you got your midwife mentor to sign these skills off and she quickly got the sign off mentor, who’d just come on an early shift to countersign them before both you and your mentor floated off home to sleep…… WITHOUT GETTING THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE SHEET SIGNED BY THE SIGN OFF MENTOR!!! YOU NEED TO GET THE SAMPLE SIGNATURE SHEET SIGNED (yes this is what happened to me!!!) If you don’t, as a first year your PAD will be referred and you will have to return to your old trust to track down the sign off mentor to sign the sample signature sheet and then resubmit the whole skill set. If you do not have all the signatures completed on the sample signature sheet in second and third year YOU WILL FAIL (this makes me feel sick!).

Another starred, bold, italic section coming up……………………….

****YOU NEED TO DATE EVERYTHING YOU SIGN****

A LOT of my cohort got our PAD skills returned to us because we hadn’t dated our signatures on our skills documents! We had ensured our mentors had dated everything but we actually hadn’t! There is no ‘date’ prompt next to the student signature section but you do need to date it! I cannot begin to tell you what a complete pain in the rear it is when you have finally tracked down the sign off mentor to sign your sample signature sheet, hobbled, exhausted and emotional to hand in the PAD documentation hoping you never have to see it again, only to get it ALL handed back as ALL my signatures needed dating! Literally, every single one of the 60 or so skills I needed to go through and date! DATE THEM!!! Believe me you will not want that PAD handed back to you! If you aren’t sure if something needs dating and signing do it anyway! I am very much ‘better to be safe than sorry’ …once bitten and all that!!!

Think that’s all the terrible tales I need to pass on about documentation!! I do wonder how I managed to even get on this degree as reading back over this makes me look a bit lacking but I blame sleep deprivation!

You will be getting your uniforms soon-empty all pockets before you take it off and buy a tub of vanish….white is a TERRIBLE colour! What were they thinking giving nervous, tired students white?!! One night shift my pen had leaked in my pocket and because I was on an antenatal ward and the women were sleeping, all the lights were dimmed ….by the time I realised my pen had leaked I had fingerprints on my uniform, on some lovely white sheets, on a couple of CTG monitors and on my face!

uniform I was very glad I had purchased a tub of vanish big enough to bath a baby in!

Good luck and DATE EVERYTHING!!!!

 

`

 

 

 

How to beat second year blues

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With second year around the corner, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little apprehensive.

I’ve heard of the elusive ‘second year blues’ and worry that they might already be setting in. Despite having a year under our belt, the end goal somehow seems further away than at the beginning. We’re a year wiser, with a better idea of the challenges ahead…and let’s face it, we’re probably all a year poorer too. All things considered, its no wonder we might feel a bit down.

In the blissful ignorance of first year, I ignored second and third years warning us that we’d feel like this – turns out they were right! In a quest to ease my own anxieties, I’ve asked the for their tips for beating second year blues. Here’s what they said…

Get ahead

I know most of us have spend the last few weeks catching up on sleep, earning some pennies or reminding our friends that we still exist, but it’s worth having a look at what’s coming up. By second year, we’re expected to be independent learners, so its up to us to be proactive and find out what is in store for us over the next year. I’ve been putting it off, but it’s time to get organised, dig out the diary and log in to Blackboard…what’s my password again?

Set goals

Somehow I’ve managed to erase all memory of PAD submission day, which seems like ages ago now, but I remember that we were asked to set some goals for the year ahead. I’ve just had a look back at mine and they actually make some sense. Personal development plans can sometimes seem like a bit of a box-ticking exercise, but having a goal in mind for second year will give you something to focus on and makes the time fly by.

Avoid stress

When I started this course, I made a pact with myself not to leave everything to the last minute. In my last degree, I tactically worked out my words/per hour ratio (about 400), convincing myself that it was totally fine to leave a 3,000 word essay to 24 hours before the deadline. Yeah, I always got them in, but I was an absolute wreck. Believe me, its not worth the stress. This degree is full on enough as it is, so help yourself out by starting early.

Oh and this applies to overcommitting too – a lesson I’ve learnt the hard way. Figure out what is really important and realise that it’s ok to say ‘no’ sometimes. I still haven’t mastered it, but it’s a work in progress.

Talk it out

Chances are that most of us will feel down at some point over the year, but if ‘the blues’ hit, don’t bottle it up.  With hundreds of student nurses about, you’re bound to find a kind, listening ear and you might find that others are feeling the same way.

Also, don’t forget the PEFs are there to address any issues you might be having on placement – take a look at this blog to find out more about their role and how they can help.

Remember it’s not all about nursing

Maybe it’s just me, but does nursing have a way of taking over your life? While on placement, it feels like you think, breathe, dream nursing – sometimes you just need to switch off. Step away from the stethoscope and plan some totally non-nurse activities for the weekend. A break will do wonders.

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Keep calm and carry on nursing

Conquering second year and banishing those blues is about finding the right balance. This course can take over if we let it, but by staying organised and making time for the other things we love, we can actually be better nurses in the long run.

See you next week!

So What Kind of Nurse Are you?

As I started my first year at university to undertake my nursing degree in mental health nursing I looked around and thought – I don’t fit in!

What am I doing here – a 37 year old with a background in the travel industry?

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Surrounded by a majority of people in their twenties who all seemed so knowledgeable on nursing I felt so behind and out of my depth! As the year passed and I overheard people talk about things they had done on placement or listened to them talk so informed in lectures etc. In honesty? –  I still felt I knew nothing compared to them.

penguin-153660_1280By second year however I had passed all my exams and placements and started to feel hang on I can do this I do know stuff – different stuff! Just because I can never remember which way round the sections are or if a medication is an anti-depressant or anti-psychotic straight off doesn’t not mean I wont make a good nurse. One staff nurse on placement gave me sound advice, she said you will learn what you need to learn for your job in your job as you will be seeing it every day. As a student we are bombarded with a constant changing supply of medications and illnesses and practices to learn, we cant remember it all!

Eventually I got the hang of the sections and most of the medications (although sometimes I still have to use the BNF.)The main thing I learned however from colleagues and other nurses on placement, but mainly through my own observations of these groups, was that it takes all sorts of nurses to make up good nursing care.

There are so many different branches of nursing, for example in mental health you have acute wards, recovery or assessment units, community teams such home treatment and crisis. There’s elderly care, CAMHS, eating disorders, early intervention… the list goes on. Each of these departments needs special skills and a special kind of person to do it. Then within that team each patient they see is an individual and will require or connect with a certain type of nurse.

We all have a role to play.star trek team

So no matter who you are or what your skills are you will find your niche in time. The beauty of the degree course these days is the mix of placements you get. I was luck as one placement just hit me and I knew where I wanted to work for sure, I’d had an idea I wanted to work with the elderly but my placements confirmed which area for me as some I loved and some I hated. I am pleased to say I am due to start my career with a Dementia Team this year and I’ve never been more excited as I know this is where I belong and I feel confident in my knowledge and skills to really make a go of this and look after the patients in my care with confidence.

You will learn what you need to learn in your time and in your own way throughout the three years of your training. What you will learn and experience in  this time will be unique to you  – but that’s what will make you the kind of nurse you want to be!

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What a difference a year makes…..a message to those starting uni in September

This time last year I was 2 weeks away from packing up my beautiful little counselling room and walking away from a career which I had worked in, enjoyed and become competent in for 15 years and I COULDN’T WAIT!

office-1Don’t get me wrong I loved….LOVED being a therapist and in some ways it defined me but I had pondered long and hard about the decision to change careers and it had been an exhausting slog getting to the stage where I felt confident to finally end my practice and leap into this new world of placements, essays, exams, university life, uniforms, night shifts, long days, hospitals, babies, women, families, doctors, midwives, HCAs, colleagues, blood, faeces, vomit, paperwork, paperwork, paperwork and STRESS but I was ready I WAS READY TO GO …or at least I thought I was!

What would I say to me this time last year:

“read everything you want to read which isn’t midwifery related because in a year you will feel guilty every time you pick up a non-midwifery related magazine/book”

“knit what you need to knit, sew that skirt and dress you’ve been desperate to get on with and RUN for hours in the evening when the kids are in bed whilst you still can as that time will swiftly become ‘study time'”

“play with your sons, read with your sons, cwtch them at bedtime and in the mornings before school because these are times you won’t be around for and you will be intoxicated with guilt for all the times you could’ve done this and didn’t. Enjoy taking them to school and picking them up as this will soon become a treat not a chore”

“go and visit your parents and explain to them that the next three years are going to be tough and you will work weekends and when you aren’t working weekends you will be studying over weekends as you have worked all week and yes, this is dreadful as dementia is slowly taking your dad away but drink him in now, absorb him and how he is in 2015 as 2016 will bring a bit less of him”

“go out with your husband-he’s a good, decent man and over the next 12 months he is going to prove time and time again that he can and will step up and be both parents to your sons and keep the kids fed, the house clean, the washing basket empty and the animals fed and you sane(ish) despite you doubting his ability to do any of these things at this moment in time”

“invest in the right people. You have amazing friends in your life, some will still be around this time next year and some won’t-friendships have seasons but you will meet the MOST amazing friends on this course and, along with a couple of decent friends already in your life, they will hold you and wipe your tears and tell you that you can do this despite you truly believing, in your soul, you have made a massive mistake. The friends you make over the next couple of months will be your ticket to making it through the next 3 years and hopefully the rest of your career because your midwife sisters are the ONLYpeople who truly understand what it takes to make it through this career choice. It is HARD but MY GOD it’s worth it”

“and most of all EMBRACE every opportunity….you are going to be scared at times, really scared; you’ve been really scared in your life before and you’ve managed to get through it but this will be a different fear; this is a fear of failure, a fear of actually causing harm because you don’t know what you’re doing, a fear or letting your family down, a fear of letting yourself down but don’t let the fear get in the way of being in the moment and experiencing every opportunity that comes your way because this job you are training for, this career, this vocation is a gift and a privilege and NOTHING that precious comes without a price”

Would I have heeded any of this advice….NAH! I was too excited but it’s nice to look back on and reflect!

To those about to start university-yes you’ll have doubts and you will probably cry and wonder if you’ve done the right thing at points over the next 12 months (& beyond I would guess!) but always force yourself to go and do your next shift as you just never know what might happen on that shift that confirms you’ve done the right thing! Plus-if you need support its there don’t be alone in your worry.

 

DILP Week 5 – Teaching and Learning in Maternity ft Muetzel

Well the outrageous fact that next week is my FINAL WEEK is madness. Right now I’m sitting pretty at 208 hours (40 to go) but it almost feels like a dream: I’m so full of questions about the culture and the way of working out here so I feel like I’m always engaged in some sort of discussion, which makes each day really rush by.

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Shout out to my amazing Nursing Therapeutics Seminar Lead – you know who you are!!!

After one such discussion with the ward Matron, she said she felt the staff could improve their communication and social skills with patients, creating more of a rapport (this took a while to figure out as she speaks rather broken English). So I briefly explained Muetzel’s model of the therapeutic relationship, which is based around Partnership, Intimacy and Reciprocity. She was so interested I ended up making a couple of posters and giving talks to staff members in little groups over the course of the week. It was a really rewarding experience for me to see these Nurses taking on this academic knowledge and applying it, almost immediately, to practice.

It was also wonderful for me to realize how much I’ve learnt during these last 2 years at UoM. Lots of what I was teaching hasn’t come up in exams and I haven’t been fastidiously revising it, but it was still there in my brain, informing how I interact with patients and being able to pass this on was such a great feeling.

All my questions though did make for a slightly awkward discussion with a consultant this week when I asked why it was the normal procedure in Sri Lanka to give Episiotomies, no matter the size of the baby: “Because Sri Lankan women are far more petite than Western women” Fair enough, I thought (the average height of a Sri Lankan woman is 4ft11) but that wasn’t what he was getting at… Gesturing with his surgical scissors he added; “For example this woman’s vagina is far smaller than yours would be”. THANKS DOCTOR. I almost died of embarrassment.

My questions haven’t all had such uncomfortable endings though. For instance I’ve become fascinated by the many superstitions and traditions deeply woven into everyday Sri Lankan life. One very common belief is that the exact time of a person’s birth is holds great importance over the course of their life.

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Its a bit of a cross between buddhism with a big emphasis on horoscopes, couples are often matched based on Birthdays

It is always noted to the minute and this information is taken to a spiritualist (Tamil or Buddhist astronomer) who produces a big document/graph thing that contains key dates to be wary of and dates of good fortune. These can be days or years. During the times of misfortune the family can offset this bad energy by giving alms, doing charitable work or attending the temple more regularly. Equally there is some level or risk management that is involved. For example if someone is predicted a bad 2016 because they were born at 4.33 instead of 4.34 then even if it made sense with every other facet of their life, big dates such as having a baby or getting married would be delayed until they were back in good favors.

I personally would not respond well to such strict time frames but I was far too curious to know what my prophecies would be. So, luckily, I was able to take a short 20-minute stroll from my apartment to the hospital where I was born, 20 years, 6 months and 5 days ago. After a quick 5 minute trip to the records room a nurse produced a huge leather-bound book, identical to the one I have been writing baby’s birth records in for the last two weeks. Except in this one, “Baby Girl Wragg” made an appearance! Thanks to this hand-written entry I am now armed with my birth time and am setting a meeting to speak to a tamil astrologer to find out how things are going for me! Hopefully 2017 with my dissertation looming, will be a very very lucky year for me or else I’ll just have to find a Buddhist temple somewhere near Stretford.

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Baby Girl Wragg OG Sri Lankan

DILP Week 3 – A&E lessons learnt

This last week has absolutely flown by!! I’ve kept myself very busy both in and out of placement which has been tiring but so rewarding!

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Scans following the admission of a lady with drowsiness and weakness following loss of consciousness

I can now run triage efficiently and effectively on my own and have been working with some really great nurses for the last two weeks who have taught me a bit of singhalese in between tasks. Key phrases you need to know as a tourist e.g. What’s your date of birth? What is your pain scoring between 0-10? Etc.

I’ve managed to get all the nurses to ask the patient for pain scores now which is a really vital thing. I only realised they weren’t asking properly when a woman who couldn’t speak with the pain in her abdomen or open her eyes fully had a 5/10 for pain written on her triage documents.. I’m in no way saying this is the only time I’ve come across falsified pain scores, unfortunately. It wasn’t at all rare to see Ward rounding forms where all patients conveniently had a pain score of 0 on my first placement in the UK. It wasn’t the case of course but writing this down meant less paperwork and less hassling the already over worked doctors. So it was sort of left unsaid and when I did rounding a and was accurate with pain scores it was met with a general groan from the staff because they had to chase up altering patients analgesia.

Pain is such a vital symptom to understand – this should be evident by the fact that all of our hospitals have a devoted “Pain Team” of specialist nurses that are like ache whisperers.

Changes in pain, not just the score but the type or the frequency can be the biggest clue you get about what’s going on with your patient and if their records aren’t accurately reflecting this evolution of their pain then we have failed that patient. For example, a headache.

It can be cause my 101 different things but if the patient is complaining of a sharp throbbing headache associated with noise or lights and also has a rash on their abdomen.. This could be meningitis. This patient might require urgent interventions. Equally, they might be having an allergic reaction or be dehydrated. However, without going into the details, we are pretty much running blind.

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This is not where anyone wants to be is it?? 

Literally 3 hours ago as I write this a woman who originally came in suffering from loose stools for 4 days arrested! She started coughing up frothy pink sputum then her heart failed, I was lucky enough to assist in giving chest compressions and ambu-bagging her to keep oxygen pumping around her system.

I had no idea what to expect from the other staff members in such a high-pressure situation but the respect and trust they showed me was pretty moving.

Having the doctors from CCU direct their questions at me about the patient, as a humble Nursing Student, was really empowering. I’m also very pleased to say that the patient’s vitals were stable when she left our care to recover in CCU.

Experiences like that today just remind me how privileged I am to be able to not only be a Nurse but to have this opportunity to travel half way across the world and still be respected, trusted and appreciated for all the hard work I have put into the degree so far. Nursing has always been a great passion of mine and it’s a truly wonderful thing when you can see that that passion exists in Nurses across the world who will work tirelessly next to you for the good of each patient that needs our care.

Call the Midwife- I need a pinard!!!

Pinard’s- Funny horn like instruments that remind me of a trumpet.

Pinard’s- what are they? Pinard’s- why call it that?

These are the questions I first asked myself as a fresh 1st year shuffling through my clinical skills book. They want evidence of antenatal assessment using a PINARD!! 😇

Once I got into antenatal clinic I was introduced to the pinard, ahhhhhh I thought…. Call the midwife!!!! I reminisced back to the series, scenes of the nuns and midwives using these funny shaped horns , pressing into a woman’s bump to hear the baby’s heart beat. Ohhhh!!!!  So what is a pinard and how does it work?

The pinard was once called a fetostethoscope, before the days of the doppler or sonic-aid, midwives would use the pinard to listen for the FH- fetal heart. It was named a “pinard” after French obstetrician Adolphe Pinard.  A pioneer in perinatal and antenatal care, he specialisesed in palpation and fetal activity. In 1895 he invented the “pinard”.

I love the pinard- I see it as a right of passage, an essential authentic midwifery tool that has been replaced by technology.

 

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It amazes me how the midwives of the past used these simple yet effective stethoscopes to keep track of fetal development.

Nothing beats the feeling of actually finding the heart beat of a baby in clinic, I adore discovering the fetal position, listening to the fetal heart and with technological advancements women are now able to hear their baby’s heart too, the sound of a fetal heart is so soothing and it is lovely to see the women comforted by their babies ‘thud thuds’.

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I do however wish the pinard was used as frequently as a sonic-aid, it is a piece of midwifery history that I believe is just as important.  I took my pinard-

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(My pretty pink pinard!! 🙂

to antenatal clinic this week, determined to practice the art!!  When I heard a beautiful beat I was elated!!!  Safe to say I will be taking my pretty pink pinard with me on placement next week, determined to keep this historical practice part of my future practice.

I recommend visiting Sara Wickhams blog about pinard use, Pinard Wisdom – Tips and Tricks from Midwives (Part 1), fascinating read into pinard use.