Never ‘just’ a student

“I’m sorry, I’m just a student.”

Sound familiar? How many times have you said this while out on placement? Maybe it’s just me, but I’m ashamed to say it’s more often than I can count, especially in the first two years of my training. It possibly stems from a lack of confidence or uncertainty, perhaps a fear that I’d do or say something wrong – something we’re all bound to experience at some point during our training.

But is this lack of confidence a wider issue among qualified nurses, as well as students? Do we sometimes have a tendency, as a profession, to devalue our work and contribution? Do we see ourselves as less important or influential than other health professionals?

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Conference programme

I recently attended the 2017 Nursing and Midwifery Conference held by the newly formed Manchester Foundation Trust at Manchester Royal Infirmary. The keynote speech was given by Dr Eden Charles, a leadership coach and consultant who has been successfully supporting individuals to create cultural change in their organisations, including the NHS, for more than 30 years. He recognised that as nurses and midwives it is in our nature to give, to put others first and to sometimes put our own needs on the back burner. But, he said, with that sometimes comes a tendency to lack confidence in our huge strength and contribution as a profession. He said he often hears nurses refer to themselves as ‘just’ the nurse and is always baffled because of how important the role really is from the perspective of patients.

As student nurses or midwives, we are on the cusp of joining the largest professional body in the health service who are in a unique and privileged role as both care givers and advocates for patients. Although not yet registered, we are still an integral part of the nursing profession and make a difference in many ways to care in the NHS. The more confidently we value our contribution, the better we can speak out for our patients and give a voice to those who otherwise might not be heard.

In his speech, Dr Charles said: “Never say ‘I am just a nurse’. Change that story to ‘I am a professional nurse’. Put yourself into the world boldly and confidently as people who deserve to have a voice.” He challenged us to be ‘nursing rebels’ or ‘rebels for compassion’; to acknowledge our strength and abilities in order to gain greater influence and make changes to practice that really matter. He reminded us that leadership can be found at all levels, not just at the top; we all have a responsibility to bring about the changes we want to see. It’s not always easy or straightforward, but as students we can make positive changes by living the values that brought us to nursing or midwifery in the first place.

So I’m making a promise to myself and I hope you will too; I will never be ‘just the student’ or ‘just a nurse’ ever again.

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Collaboration: the future of our NHS- #nurswivesunite

13151090_226356241076122_2131036156_nI write this not to highlight the negatives of our current NHS in crisis, but to address how we can collaboratively work together to save our glorious institution.

I don’t need to talk about our failing health service, I don’t need to talk about the millions of pounds needed from the money tree to keep our beloved institution a float. I don’t need to talk about what the NHS means to Britain and its people, I don’t need to talk about the pressures, the constraints we as healthcare professionals all face.

What we need to talk about is how we can change the future.  I don’t think I’m wrong in saying this is without question the hardest time ever to train to be a nurse or midwife.

We’ve lost our bursary, some of us have lost our passion, our dreams of delivering the care we want to.  Who do we thank for this? Is it a question of politics? Or has our health service just reached a tremendous plateau of increased life expectancy, a rise in population, increased complex care which have become a potent mix given the current economic climate.

How do we adapt?

Collaboration that’s how!

Collaboration– “A purposeful relationship in which all parties strategically choose to cooperate in order to achieve shared or overlapping objectives.”

I love this definition, it epitomises what I believe is at the heart of what we all signed up for; whether you are a student midwife or student nurse we all have overlapping goals, we all CARE.

 We all want to deliver the best care possible whereby it be to a baby on neonatal unit, an Alzheimer’s patient, a child, a patient on a high dependency unit, a labouring woman, they all deserve the same amount of care and compassion.

 We are governed by the code (NMC 2015), we all follow the code, are regulated by the code, we all follow the same overlapping objectives -care, compassion and empathy.

As a whole we are truely invincible.  We have the power to stand up and fight. We have the power to change OUR NHS !!!

Let’s get to know one another, the roles we represent, the care we provide and how we can support each other.  Once we are fully united then I believe we have the power to transform and adapt to the future of our glorious glorious service.

 

Happy Nurses’ Day!

Nurses day banner

Today marks Nurses’ Day, the anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birthday and a worldwide celebration of all those fabulous nurses out there.

It’s a chance to recognise the difference nurses are making around the world and say thank you for their care, courage and compassion.

We all chose to study nursing for our own personal reasons and throughout the course we will each have our own completely unique experience – but I love to think that at the end, we’ll join a pretty special international community of nurses. That’s definitely something to be proud of!

The theme this year is ‘Improving health systems’ resilience’, which seems appropriate; it feels like the NHS has been in the news non-stop this year – A&E waiting times, the junior doctors strikes and of course cuts to student nurse bursaries. There’s no doubt that our health service is under pressure, but as nurses we can play a vital role in strengthening the NHS. It’s easy to feel like we are only a tiny part of a very big, complex machine – but we can all make a positive change and together we’re unstoppable.

If a nurse has inspired you then why not say thank you? The Royal College of Nursing also have twibbons for Facebook and Twitter if you want to show your support.