International #hellomynameis Day

July 23rd marks International #hellomynameis day. The #hellomynameis campaign was started by Dr Kate Granger MBE, a lady who set up a campaign in August 2013 using social media after receiving treatment in hospital for terminal cancer and realising that not all of the staff helping to support her introduced themselves. The campaign has raised awareness about the importance of healthcare professionals telling service users their name and role to help improve communication and increase the quality of patient care. The 23rd of July sadly marks the anniversary of Kate’s passing, though her husband Chris Pointon continues to travel the world delivering talks about Kate’s story and how we as healthcare professionals can improve people’s experiences of being cared for.

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Hello, my name is Abbie and I am a student mental health nurse. As I am a couple of weeks away from the end of my first year I have had lots of contact with service users on practice placements so I’ve been able to get a flavour of how much of a difference introductions can make from a professional perspective. From a personal perspective when I’ve been treated myself and accompanying loved ones to the hospital or the doctors I’ve witnessed professionals assessing not just the physical health but also the personal thoughts and feelings (mental health assessments are very thorough – see here) of people without telling them their name. Not doing so can put up a barrier to communication as the service user may feel awkward and uncomfortable with disclosing very sensitive information that they may previously have never shared with anybody before to a nameless stranger. A simple introduction can make the service user feel more valued and willing to talk about things like what they’ve been experiencing and what they wish to gain from treatment, which helps professionals deliver person-centred care that is tailored to each individual’s needs. Kate’s #hellomynameis campaign strives to improve patient experiences and aligns with the 6 Cs, values underpinning effective nursing practice that were set out in Compassion in Practice: Evidencing the Impact (2016).

6csSome University of Manchester students find themselves on placement within the Tameside and Glossop Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust, which is where a number of nurses dubbed ‘Kate Granger nurses’ are the first in the UK to have been appointed. Kate Granger nurses will wear special identifiable badges and aim to encourage staff members in the trust to demonstrate effective communication and uphold the standards of compassionate care that Kate and her husband Chris have spent years campaigning for.

Searching #hellomynameis online brings up a wealth of posts showing healthcare professionals and service users pledging their support for the campaign. Visit the campaign’s website to see what events Kate’s husband is attending and find out more about how you can get involved.

 

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Patients aren’t Specimens!

I don’t know if many of you watched Call the Midwife this week (massive fan #sorrynotsorry) but part of it really resonated with me. I can’t comment on the accuracy of the actual midwifery, I’ll have to leave that one to our resident student midwife bloggers, but there was one scene that really stood out as a fantastic example of patient advocacy.

In the episode a woman and her partner, both with achondroplasia, are expecting their first child. We see her anxiously awaiting a Caesarean section as she goes into early labour. On the ward prior to surgery the surgeon discusses her case bluntly in front of her to a crowd of medical students, speaking about her as if she wasn’t there. Later on in the episode we see her again with her new baby (after plenty of dramatic tension!), this time the doctor leads the ward round of students in but the nurse steps in and stops him with “Mrs Reed is not a specimen, she’s a mother”.

Sometimes on placement you may see staff refer to patients as “Bed 11”, “The side room”, or “The hip replacement”, just to give a few examples. We’re no longer in the 1950s so there’s really no excuse for patriarchal attitudes in healthcare! If you want to observe a procedure, always introduce yourself to the patient and ask their permission. Ensure your request is worded so there’s no pressure on them to agree and if your mentor or another nurse is asking for the patient’s consent on your behalf it’s sometimes better if you wait elsewhere. Although most patients are happy for you to take part in their care and observe learning opportunities, if you’re hovering at the bedside some patients may find it difficult to refuse even if they aren’t keen on having any observers.

If you ever notice any ‘Mrs Reed’ moments or see any aspect of a patient’s care that doesn’t sit right with you, it is so important that you find the courage to speak out and challenge these behaviours. For me, ‘The Nan Rule’ is a great mantra: if it’s not good enough for your grandma/parent/sibling/best friend etc.. then it’s not good enough for your patient. The #hellomynameis campaign started by Dr Kate Granger is another inspired idea to improve patient communication with empathy and compassion.

Never forget your patients are people too, always treat them with dignity and respect and speak up for them when you see situations you aren’t happy with. Always remember the NMC code of conduct and contact your AA and PEF if you’re worried about raising concerns.

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#hellomynameis Kate

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Kate Granger, the founder of the amazing campaign ‘#hellomynameis’, wonderful doctor and cancer patient, died this week. Throughout her treatment, she spoke up and informed healthcare professionals how they could improve their practice by doing something simple; introducing themselves. A simple introduction, she believed, could go a long way. The patient needs to feel like a person, not just a list of symptoms. This is the exactly what patient-centered care is all about; Kate hit the nail on the head, we need to change our behaviour.

When I first came into contact with this campaign, I thought “gosh how could anybody forget to introduce themselves?” but it happens, and I’ll put my hands up and say there has been a moment when the patient has had to ask me! But it does make all the difference because it is the beginning of a professional-therapeutic relationship, and the patient needs to be able to trust their caregiver. It makes me smile when patients are happy to say “Kate, can I just ask you a question?” Or “Kate can you just do this?”.  It makes the situation a little bit more normal, less formal and that helps people relax.

What we need to learn from Kate’s work is that speaking up is the best way to kickstart change. If you see something, or think that something could work better- do not be afraid to speak up. Even if you just mention it to your mentor, write it in a reflection to show to your academic adviser, maybe even a blog post…. it can do a world of good. It might not turn into a nationwide social media campaign, but the smallest changes can make the biggest difference. For example, Natasha (one of our lovely bloggers) has been using her knowledge, and spreading it amongst the staff in the Sri Lankan hospital where she completed her DILP placement. You can read that blog post here as it’s a good example of what I’m trying to get across.

The #hellomynameis campaign is still going strong, and I don’t think it will be slowing down anytime soon! Kate’s family and supporters are keen to keep her amazing work going, and I for one will happily get more involved. You can get involved on Twitter or just through the website.

Rest in peace Kate, thank-you for inspiring us.