What can nursing give to me?

Becoming a student nurse can consume you. With placement and academic work mixed together, it can often feel like all you do is nursing! On top of that, we often focus on what you can do for nursing. But what about what nursing can offer for you?

Recently, I’ve opened my eyes and seen the reciprocity within nursing. It started with my Nursing Therapeutic module, where we’ve been learning about Muetzels model who says that a therapeutic relationship between a patient and their nurse requires three components. These include: partnership, intimacy and reciprocity. Since we explored how a therapeutic relationship could benefit both the patient and the nurse, I thought maybe nurses get more out of their career choice than I thought?

Confidence! Going into placement takes guts. You are literally throwing yourself into new situations with new people everyday, and that takes a certain amount of confidence. Speaking to the wider MDT use to fill me with dread, but now I basically chasing them around for questions. This has reflected into my personal confidence A LOT. I am more sure of myself, and what I want to get out of situations.

unknown-2Time management. I thought I was organised before I came to uni. I was wrong. I feel I’ve reached a higher-level, as uni has forced me to gain the ability to spread out my work so I’m not over-exerting myself. It’s a VERY good skill, as it’s very easy to become burnt out. Spreading out work helps you fit in the other important stuff that isn’t necessarily related to nursing/uni but is absolutely vital! Get yourself a fab diary and a calendar life will become easier.

Problem-solving. I recently attended an inter-professional workshop with our lovely midwives all about the health needs of refugees. Once we were put into teams, it was like somnurses and midwiveseone lit a spark! Suddenly, adult nurses + midwives + child nurses + mental health nurses were able to outline all these potential solutions to the fictional family we were ‘caring for’. We were more than able to use our combined knowledge to solve the situation with ease!

Honesty. Before uni, I would often be told to do something at work/school and just nod endlessly until they told me to go and do it. What would happen? I would have literally no idea what I was meant to be doing. You can’t really do that in nursing, so you end up asking more questions and understanding where you need support. This not only shows honesty, but it shows a lot of maturity as well.

This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but its great to reflect back on how you’ve grown. I would urge any of you to do the same! Not only is it a useful skill for interviews, but it really helps with realising why this degree is so worth it.

What has nursing given to you? Comment, tell us on facebook/twitter or send us an email!

“The doctor says I’m dying”: tough conversations about death

One of my most vivid placement memories was my first conversation with a patient about dying. One afternoon I went to check on Joan (name changed), a lady in a side room on an elderly ward. I was helping her to have a drink when she looked up and said: “the doctor says I’m dying.”

I froze. My stomach turned and my mind started racing, taken aback by a statement I felt totally unprepared to respond to. I had grown fond of Joan and to see her so distressed was upsetting. I felt a sense of panic, worried that I might say the wrong thing.

I knew from the handover that morning that Joan was receiving end of life care and from what the other nurses had said, she was deteriorating and it was unlikely that she would get any better.

Taking a deep breath, I thought back to our communication lectures which covered how to deal with difficult questions. I drew up a chair next to Joan and holding her hand, I asked some straightforward questions like ‘when did you discover that?’ and ‘how does that make you feel?’, trying my best to mask my own anxiety and appear relaxed.

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While I think I started off ok, all of a sudden I panicked; I didn’t know what to say next.  Almost without thinking, I said: “Don’t worry Joan, we’re all doing everything we can to get you better and back to your normal self.”

I immediately felt awful and her face said it all; she knew I was covering. I said it out of a desire to help Joan stay hopeful, optimistic, but in reality it sounded trite, like I was brushing her off and trying to avoid a deeper conversation. I think that it made her feel worse.

Kicking myself, I spoke to my mentor who reassured me that she too struggled with questions like those and some research when I got home that night revealed that I wasn’t alone – apparently it’s common for healthcare professionals to avoid or block difficult questions, particularly about death or dying. I suppose we like to focus on how we can ‘fix’ things and don’t want our patients to lose hope.

Looking back, I wish I’d spent more time with Joan, even just to sit quietly by her side. She may have had more questions that she wanted to ask and as a student nurse, I may not have known the answers but I could have found out on her behalf.

Honesty and courage are such important parts of nursing, especially at the end of someone’s life. Sometimes the best thing we can do is to be there; to listen, answer questions and ease fears – or just to hold someone’s hand and let them know that they are not alone.

Top Tips for Your First Placement

 

There is only two weeks until the first year placements start!!! Not only has this made me super nostalgic (and panicky because I’m halfway through my degree now), but it gave me the idea to write down some top tips.

Be YOU. This may sound like the cheesiest advice ever, but it’s true. With every placement, I’ve started this year, I’ve been quiet and not myself at all for the first few weeks because I’m so nervous. But what I’ve (finally) learnt is that once I started acting like me, I felt so much more relaxed. Make jokes, smile, talk to your colleagues. The secret to making it through any shift, even when you’re not having a great day, is with the people you work with! PLUS, the more you act naturally on placement, the easier it will be to feel more and more like a proper nurse, not just some clown in a uniform.

Throw yourself into every opportunity (if you’re comfortable****). I made a habit of not saying no to any task that was handed to me, just so I could experience everything. Sure, I didn’t always want to walk down to the Pharmacy and ask (for the 8th time that day) where our medication was , but it helped! I got to know the hospital, understand the breadth of the role that the pharmacy has, and take a little breather from the business of the ward. Even boring tasks help you learn something, even if all you’ve learnt is I’m not a mad fan of this!

****Sometimes, you aren’t ready. There are times when you will be asked to do something (like giving an injection) and you might not feel ready. That is OKAY! Talk to your mentor, learn the methods and take some baby steps. You get to decide when you’re ready!

Don’t beat yourself up for making mistakes. They happen all the time. We are learning and working! You’ll do things wrong sometimes and that is okay. Whoever is teaching you should walk you through it anyway.

Talk about your day! One of my favorite times of day whilst on placement is going home and getting it all off my chest. Since I live with non-nurses, I often filter out the gory bits (bless them) but it really helps to process the day and reflect.

Get your paperwork sorted out on time! Both of my first-year placements involved me panicking because I didn’t talk to my mentor about paperwork. I thought it would make me look pushy. It doesn’t. 99.99% of the time, your mentor might have just forgotten or they might have a plan of their own. Just talk to them! If issues arise from there, talk to your PEF and AA.

And finally- GOOD LUCK! This journey is hard and can be frustrating, but there will be so many days when it’s so so worth it.

If anyone fancies trying their hand at blogging their experiences with placement, why not give us an email, a Facebook message or a tweet? We’re always on the lookout for more student nurse’s and midwives!

Healthy Eating-YES you can!

Since starting Nursing I feel I have been unintentionally gaining unwanted weight and with each academic year I promise myself this year will be different. And we all know how New Year resolutions turns out (sad, but true). I use to be great at meal prepping and avoiding junk food. After my night shifts and the ridiculous long hours I started to feel tired, stressed and would skip meals or ate whatever was easiest at the time (most of the time it was junk food *sigh*). I stopped cooking (which I love to do), I did not stick to my usual routine of eating (big breakfast, medium lunch and smaller dinner), instead I would skip all meals and eat one large meal when I got home at 9PM (yes, very unhealthy eating at that time) and that meal could sometimes be just toast (once i ate 8 pieces of toast within a 24 hour period *ashamed*). Then in the morning I would be so HANGRY (hungry & angry) because I want to eat but don’t have time to eat. At times I would come home from a long day, knowing I have a 04:30am start the next day I would make a decision: to eat, to shower, to sleep? and most of the time it was to sleep.

But this September I decided enough was enough and did something about it. These are my five tips to eating healthy/better and working a 12 hour shift (night shifts are the worst for eating properly- its so easy to eat nonsense, especially when staff bring in quick food to munch on).

#1 MAKE LUNCH: During first year I use to cook lovely delicious healthy meals and bring in nutritious snacks and occasionally a cheeky chocolate bar. I bought a new lunch box, wrote out a meal plan for the week and stuck to it. (most of my time is spent thinking about what to eat). Plus I get to use my half hour (if that) to actually sit and eat properly rather then going to a shop to get a sandwich (that I do not want) and eat quickly in ten minutes.

#2 ALWAYS MAKE LUNCH THE NIGHT BEFORE: you will never wake up early (earlier rather) to make your lunch. I have lied to my self more than I can count, I’d rather sleep then eat (as we have already established :-p). You are always to tired before work to cook anyway. I suppose for night shifts it is a little easier.

#3 DRINK WATER: I keep a 1 litre of water with me all the time. I am continuously drinking. This not only keeps you hydrated but also stops you from snacking on biscuits/chocolates.  To be honest, water is my answer to everything! It reduces my headaches, my cravings and keeps me focused. Not to mention how great water is for your skin. It keeps you less stressed through the day as you are hydrated and makes you feel full (so you don’t get HANGRY).

#4  NEVER SKIP MEALS: As I have mentioned I have a huge tendency to do that. It is easy to skip meals when you are in a busy working environment. Make time to eat, you owe that to yourself. If you can not got for a lunch break, keep fruits, granola bars with you and munch on them as you write your nursing notes. If you skip meals, you go home hungry and feel you can eat your whole fridge.

#5 AVOID JUNK: Easier said than done, I know. But if you remove junk from your household and do not buy them when you are out then you will avoid the excess sugar and fat. I’ve started to buy lots of fresh fruit and veg, from continuously eating such food you can change your cravings and habits. I really believe that the more your eat healthy the more your body wants healthy food. Once I was addicted to carrots and hummus, I would keep a bag of carrot sticks and a pot of hummus with me all the time because I craved it.

Bottom line. You can eat healthy whilst being a nurse. Bring healthy snacks with you to munch throughout the day. Try to have your lunch halfway through your shift (I know that can be difficult). When patients give the staff chocolates to say thank you, be careful with your hand because it will have a mind of its own and you will end up eating one to many! I truly believe that a healthy nurse is an efficient nurse, it will allow you to be always on your ‘A game’ and you will feel great!

Please share any tips you have to eating better on a 12 hour shift.

 

I’m Not Learning as Much as Everyone Else!?!

Ever get that feeling that everyone else on your course is quickly becoming an expert? Do they all quote things you’ve never heard of or are they all re-telling all the things they have seen and done on placement?

Feel like you are not on the same level as them?

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Feel like you are falling behind or missing something??

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It’s more than likely you are not missing anything or falling behind, everyone learns differently and especially out in placement people experience and view things different. People may find one aspect of placement really interesting and new whereas you may find it common sense or routine – and vice versa. This doesn’t mean either of you are better than the other – just different.

It’s good to learn from each other’s experiences but don’t feel left out. Ask if you’re not sure what it is they have actually done on placement – you may be surprised. Everyone has a different view point on tasks they get do to or see in practice. Use their understanding to enhance yours. Share your views as well as listening to others. Finding those who have a similar view or been on a similar placement to share knowledge and understanding is great – finding those who have done something completely different is also a great way to develop your knowledge and understanding.

You are learning too! Look back at what you have learnt and what you have achieved on placements. I bet you have done more than you think! We all take a different journey through our nursing training – enjoy yours!

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