My ‘lollipop moment’

Have you ever had your life changed, even just a little bit, by a total stranger?

Several months ago, my boyfriend showed me a TED Talk called Everyday Leadership. The premise of this talk is about ‘lollipop moments’, when a stranger makes a difference to your life. The speaker, Drew Dudley, was lucky enough to be told by the person he helped, and how much of a difference he made to her life. The really interesting point that Drew also makes is how we often don’t realize that we make these differences to people!

I had my ‘lollipop moment’ today, at the Freshers fair whilst I was working at a stall. A woman approached the stall with her friend, and recognized me immediately. She told me that I had talked to her before her nursing interview this year, and helped her feel a little bit less nervous. I didn’t remember this moment until she reminded me!

I think the concept of ‘lollipop moments’ applies to nursing really well. Although it may sometimes feel as though we are endlessly doing paperwork and working in areas horrendously understaffed, we are making a difference. Somewhere in the world, you have changed somebody’s life for the better, just by doing what you love!

Have you ever had a lollipop moment, or did someone change your life for the better? Let us know by commenting, tweeting us or write your own blog post and submit it to enhancingplacement@gmail.com

Advertisements

Handling complaints: what I never learnt as a waitress

I have never been good at receiving complaints. Before I started my nursing degree, I worked as a waitress for 5 years. It was not uncommon to deal with customer complaints on a daily basis, and I would always just say “I’m really sorry about that. I’ll speak to my manager” which was always a fail safe. 98% of the time, the customer didn’t want to speak to me anyway!

Image result for waitress

Accurate picture of me listening to customer complaints

But that changed when I started my nursing. Suddenly, whilst trying to make small talk with patients, I was being confronted with complaints about care they had received in the past or at that very moment. I couldn’t get away with my usual spiel because care complaints are more specific, more personal. You have to say something, and sorry doesn’t quite cut it.

I remember, very vividly, the first time I saw a nurse deal with a complaint efficiently. The patient in question was raising her concerns about the referral system for district nurse visits after a stay in hospital. Her care had been delayed due to this. The nurse I was working with listened to her very carefully, occasionally (when appropriate) asked for more detail and did not seem flustered at all. She then thanked the patient, said she would follow this up but urged her to voice her complaint at PALS.

PALS stands for Patient Advice and Liaison Service. It is confidential, and designed to provide support for patients, relatives and carers.

I was amazed at how calmly the whole situation went. Although the patient was upset initially, she was clearly at ease by the end of the visit, and I felt it was due to her being able to voice her opinion. And she was actively encouraged to talk about her concerns as Image result for complaintsit helps the NHS grow as an organisation! And it inspired me!

Since this event, I feel as though I have been inundated with patient complaints. Sometimes I feel as if there is a secret sign on my head that says please voice your thoughts at me!. I have now had endless practice at being calm and friendly, with some situations leading to me having to be a little firm (I will not be shouted at). I find that listening a lot, speaking barely at all, seems to work. Asking them to expand, answering questions when needed, and most importantly not denying their claims. It is extremely important, I think, to acknowledge that not every care interaction is perfect or goes to plan. We must embrace feedback, negative or not! Whether it comes from a staff member, a patient or a relative; complaints should be listened to!

Always speak to your mentor or a staff member about a patient’s complaints. 

Be Resilient, Stay Brilliant

Student nursing takes many different skills: patience, compassion, dedication, the ability to plaster a smile on your face for 12 hours even when you’re exhausted, and more. But there is one skill I never thought would be so useful; resilience!

Resilience is when you’ve made a simple mistake and you can feel the embarrassment creeping up, but you carry on caring and learning. It’s what makes you keep going when someone doubts your ability. It is what you use to take in constructive (but sometimes not!) criticism on an essay, a presentation or an act of care. Resilience is the ability to bounce back!

I didn’t realize how important resilience was until I was having an incredibly busy day on my last placement on an acute medical ward. Myself and my mentor had ended up with a few very poorly patients, an astonishing amount of paperwork, delayed transport for a patient and some awkward available beds mix ups. To help out, I offered to call a unit an explain that patient they were transferring to us needed to be delayed slightly, due to late transport. I was greeted with what I describe as understandable anger and frustration. I spoke as calmly as possible, explaining that we were sorting the situation and that the patient would not be delayed much longer. The nurse I spoke to continued to berate me on the phone, and eventually hung up.

Luckily, within 10 minutes, we had managed to sort the entire situation out. No more angry phone calls for the day! I spoke to my mentor about what had happened, and she reassured me that it was just a tough situation and not to take it to heart. I still get slightly annoyed when I think back, but I have to remind myself that we are all just looking out for our patients. Sometimes that comes across in different ways! I think if I was a qualified nurse, I would have had a better understanding of how to deal with the situation. But I know for sure that I will not forget this phone call.

Remember; if you have experienced a situation like mine, please talk to someone about it! Whether it is your mentor, a fellow student, the PEF, your AA, friend, family dog etc. Difficult situations should be discussed, and you are allowed to vent. I can highly recommend writing a reflection about it!

Have you had any moments of resilience? Let us know in the comments, or on Facebook/Twitter. Or, if you’re feeling creative, write us a blog post!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Interview with Ian Wilson – Mental Health Lecturer

word-cloud-ianIan Wilson, Honourary Teaching Fellow in the Mental Health Field has given us an early christmas present in the form of this amazing, honest interview about his specialist field – Mental Health, specifically discussing his work in the community with dually diagnosed service users (those with mental health and substance misuse diagnoses). This is a truly insightful piece with some wonderful tips and advice for all fields of Nursing.

ENJOY!!…

 

What do you enjoy most about working in the community?

I enjoy the autonomy of community work. I enjoy being truly collaborative with my service users and colleagues. I enjoy the flexibility and responsiveness that community work offers workers and their clients. I enjoy the equalization of the ‘power balance’ between professionals and service users that community work offers.

What do you enjoy most about working with the university?

Regular contact with students is undoubtedly the most rewarding part of my university job. I welcome the enthusiasm, creativity, professionalism and dedication to mental health nursing that I see students frequently displaying. Because of this student contact I am reassured about the future of my profession and reassured about the future of mental health services.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Mental Health Nurses today?

I believe that we MUST maintain and nurture our own professional identity as mental health nurses. We have a unique perspective and a unique therapeutic trust. Both of these things are a huge privilege. We must ensure that this is not diluted.

Even as Student Nurses we can sometimes neglect our own mental health, especially with dissertations looming, what advice would you give students struggling with university stress?

I manage my own stress through regular exercise. I also have a group of friends who I can trust. Some of them are nurses, most of them aren’t. I have different groups of friends for different aspects of my life; my ‘football’ friends; my ‘music’ friends; my ‘work’ friends; friends I’ve known for 40 years or more, friends who have only recently entered my life. I rely on them all for support and encouragement.

How has your role as a Mental health Nurse changed since you registered?

I commenced my career as an inpatient staff nurse (two years). I then moved into community mental health nursing and I’ve done that for 20 + years. During that time my roles have changed and my responsibilities have increased. However, my core values have changed surprisingly little. I would still recognize myself from 25 years ago!

What qualities make a great Mental Health Nurse?

Empathy, unconditional positive regard, honesty, therapeutic optimism, positivity, self-reflection, a genuine interest in other people’s lives, open mindedness, a sense of humour, resilience, resourcefulness, self-reliance.

What made you choose to work with those suffering from drug and alcohol misuse?

I have both personal and professional reasons for working with dually-diagnosed (both mental health & substance misuse) service users. Additionally, I find service users with ‘dual’ problems resourceful, resilient, insightful and challenging. This keeps me going!

f3766f876d143ea85bd35fb7b63cabaf731c5493-3-1.jpgWhat piece of advice would you give Mental Health Student Nurses today?

Take every opportunity that comes your way to promote non-stigmatising attitudes towards mental health service users. Promote acceptance and respect among your colleagues. Use evidence based practice wherever possible. Have confidence to stand up against poor practice whenever you encounter it. Always push to improve services and your own skills and knowledge as a nurse.

From your experience working with service users who smoke cannabis, have you seen a therapeutic effect from taking it as a method of self-medicating and not just for recreational use?

Yes. For instance, a man with bi-polar illness has been using cannabis to regulate his mood. He has been actively attempting to reduce his cannabis use but as soon as he starts to reduce, he experiences a relapse into distressing elevated mood. His answer to this currently is to attempt to grow his own cannabis, which, he hopes, will be high in cannabidiols (anti-psychotic and sedating) rather than high in THC (very psychosis inducing). He is proving to be partially successful. However, in my experience this is unusual. Most of the service users I’ve worked with for many years do not get a good therapeutic effect from cannabis. Quite the opposite in fact. For almost all service users with psychotic illnesses cannabis can be a disaster for their mental health prognosis.

What impact do you think there would be on mental health services if cannabis was to be decriminalised or legalised in the UK?

Taking cannabis misuse out of the legal system and into the healthcare system would enable those people who have problems with cannabis misuse to seek appropriate help and treatment. It would also remove it from the control of organized crime.

From your experience what role does excessive alcohol consumption play in the development of mental health disorders?

This is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. Demographically, 50% of people entering alcohol treatment services have a severe depressive illness. 20% of people have a psychotic disorder (Weaver et al 2003). Whether this is a consequence of drinking excessively, or whether drinking excessively is a causative factor in the development of illnesses is, of course, usually too complex to fully determine.

legalhighs_2130872a

Legal Highs come in all sorts of forms and can be bought on the high street

With the rise of “legal highs” and previously uncommon substances of abuse (such as ketamine) in Greater Manchester, has their been a notable shift in conditions patients suffer with as the popular drugs of choice have changed?

I believe that there is now no doubt that many of the newer substances, such as synthetic cannabinoids and highly potent stimulants such as PMA and methadrone are potentially far more dangerous to both physical and mental health. Synthetic cannabinoids, especially, appear to be very dangerous and unpredictable. However, their use, among mental health service users and people in general seems to be increasing year by year.

If you could give child/adult field nurses a few key points to convey to patients they may encounter that they believe might be struggling with drug or alcohol abuse what would they be?

  • Be honest but non-judgmental about peoples’ lifestyle choices
  • Encourage service users to discuss issues of substance misuse in an open and honest manner
  • Listen to what they tell you and find ways of reflecting back what they’ve said
  • Express empathy about their situation in relation to substance misuse. Be especially empathic about the difficulty their substance misuse is causing them and how it may be preventing them to achieve their goals
  • Seek permission to offer information which is neutral, up-to-date, and presented in an accessible form. Check out carefully what they make of this information
  • If they don’t want to change their current patterns of substance misuse, carry on discussing the issue in an open and honest manner, avoid arguing or persuading; offer harm reduction tips
  • Keep the door open to possible intervention in the future

The next chapter: Starting a new academic year

Last week I was going to post a blog about how I was feeling about starting third year but feeling terrified was my overriding feeling, and no one needs that kind of negativity, right?! I decided to wait until my first day back to write my feelings. So, here goes.

Firstly, I am exhausted! Woah, information overload! But not too exhausted to write to you lovely bunch so may be exaggerating a little! Today we were afforded an incredible opportunity to speak to trusts from all over the country and learn what they want from students applying for jobs. I felt anxious entering the room but left university feeling inspired. I feel like I can be anything I want to be! The trouble is, I don’t know exactly what I want to do yet. I know what my key interests are and know that I want to consolidate my learning in my first role as a qualified nurse but there isn’t currently a specialism screaming out at me. That’s okay though, isn’t it? Here I am referring to this as ‘trouble’. Pardon? This is a PRIVILEGE!

I received encouraging feedback today from representatives from different trusts, as well as from my colleagues. We’ve talked through the benefits of keeping a professional profile and throughout that discussion I flicked through some of my written feedback… Wow! I had forgotten about some of these kind and inspiring words.

I’ve complied a little list of pick-me-up reminders influenced by today’s activities and how I was feeling just last week. I thought I would share them and maybe you might take something from them too:

thirdyearbegins

  • Try to recognise whether I’m thinking rationally
  • Read over feedback and realise my potential
  • Focus on the positives. I have another year of study and a future of continued professional development – even my weaknesses can be positives!
  • Pat myself on the back. I have shown myself I can do so well already
  • Remind myself why I wanted to nurse and reignite those drivers
  • Get organised. Taking some time now for good planning will save a lot of time and worry in the long run. Time to get everything in that shiny new diary!
  • Take some time to digest ‘information overload’ – break it into more manageable pieces
  • Remember that it is okay to feel a bit overwhelmed – I’m not the only one feeling this way. I must remember to be good to myself and do something that is not nursing-related from time-to-time… Starting this weekend!

Now I approach this academic year feeling like I can achieve anything if I work hard enough. I’ve got this! And you have too!

Special thanks to today’s speakers, exhibitors and organisers for a motivating and informative day.