What can nursing give to me?

Becoming a student nurse can consume you. With placement and academic work mixed together, it can often feel like all you do is nursing! On top of that, we often focus on what you can do for nursing. But what about what nursing can offer for you?

Recently, I’ve opened my eyes and seen the reciprocity within nursing. It started with my Nursing Therapeutic module, where we’ve been learning about Muetzels model who says that a therapeutic relationship between a patient and their nurse requires three components. These include: partnership, intimacy and reciprocity. Since we explored how a therapeutic relationship could benefit both the patient and the nurse, I thought maybe nurses get more out of their career choice than I thought?

Confidence! Going into placement takes guts. You are literally throwing yourself into new situations with new people everyday, and that takes a certain amount of confidence. Speaking to the wider MDT use to fill me with dread, but now I basically chasing them around for questions. This has reflected into my personal confidence A LOT. I am more sure of myself, and what I want to get out of situations.

unknown-2Time management. I thought I was organised before I came to uni. I was wrong. I feel I’ve reached a higher-level, as uni has forced me to gain the ability to spread out my work so I’m not over-exerting myself. It’s a VERY good skill, as it’s very easy to become burnt out. Spreading out work helps you fit in the other important stuff that isn’t necessarily related to nursing/uni but is absolutely vital! Get yourself a fab diary and a calendar life will become easier.

Problem-solving. I recently attended an inter-professional workshop with our lovely midwives all about the health needs of refugees. Once we were put into teams, it was like somnurses and midwiveseone lit a spark! Suddenly, adult nurses + midwives + child nurses + mental health nurses were able to outline all these potential solutions to the fictional family we were ‘caring for’. We were more than able to use our combined knowledge to solve the situation with ease!

Honesty. Before uni, I would often be told to do something at work/school and just nod endlessly until they told me to go and do it. What would happen? I would have literally no idea what I was meant to be doing. You can’t really do that in nursing, so you end up asking more questions and understanding where you need support. This not only shows honesty, but it shows a lot of maturity as well.

This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but its great to reflect back on how you’ve grown. I would urge any of you to do the same! Not only is it a useful skill for interviews, but it really helps with realising why this degree is so worth it.

What has nursing given to you? Comment, tell us on facebook/twitter or send us an email!

The next chapter: Starting a new academic year

Last week I was going to post a blog about how I was feeling about starting third year but feeling terrified was my overriding feeling, and no one needs that kind of negativity, right?! I decided to wait until my first day back to write my feelings. So, here goes.

Firstly, I am exhausted! Woah, information overload! But not too exhausted to write to you lovely bunch so may be exaggerating a little! Today we were afforded an incredible opportunity to speak to trusts from all over the country and learn what they want from students applying for jobs. I felt anxious entering the room but left university feeling inspired. I feel like I can be anything I want to be! The trouble is, I don’t know exactly what I want to do yet. I know what my key interests are and know that I want to consolidate my learning in my first role as a qualified nurse but there isn’t currently a specialism screaming out at me. That’s okay though, isn’t it? Here I am referring to this as ‘trouble’. Pardon? This is a PRIVILEGE!

I received encouraging feedback today from representatives from different trusts, as well as from my colleagues. We’ve talked through the benefits of keeping a professional profile and throughout that discussion I flicked through some of my written feedback… Wow! I had forgotten about some of these kind and inspiring words.

I’ve complied a little list of pick-me-up reminders influenced by today’s activities and how I was feeling just last week. I thought I would share them and maybe you might take something from them too:

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  • Try to recognise whether I’m thinking rationally
  • Read over feedback and realise my potential
  • Focus on the positives. I have another year of study and a future of continued professional development – even my weaknesses can be positives!
  • Pat myself on the back. I have shown myself I can do so well already
  • Remind myself why I wanted to nurse and reignite those drivers
  • Get organised. Taking some time now for good planning will save a lot of time and worry in the long run. Time to get everything in that shiny new diary!
  • Take some time to digest ‘information overload’ – break it into more manageable pieces
  • Remember that it is okay to feel a bit overwhelmed – I’m not the only one feeling this way. I must remember to be good to myself and do something that is not nursing-related from time-to-time… Starting this weekend!

Now I approach this academic year feeling like I can achieve anything if I work hard enough. I’ve got this! And you have too!

Special thanks to today’s speakers, exhibitors and organisers for a motivating and informative day.

How to beat second year blues

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With second year around the corner, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little apprehensive.

I’ve heard of the elusive ‘second year blues’ and worry that they might already be setting in. Despite having a year under our belt, the end goal somehow seems further away than at the beginning. We’re a year wiser, with a better idea of the challenges ahead…and let’s face it, we’re probably all a year poorer too. All things considered, its no wonder we might feel a bit down.

In the blissful ignorance of first year, I ignored second and third years warning us that we’d feel like this – turns out they were right! In a quest to ease my own anxieties, I’ve asked the for their tips for beating second year blues. Here’s what they said…

Get ahead

I know most of us have spend the last few weeks catching up on sleep, earning some pennies or reminding our friends that we still exist, but it’s worth having a look at what’s coming up. By second year, we’re expected to be independent learners, so its up to us to be proactive and find out what is in store for us over the next year. I’ve been putting it off, but it’s time to get organised, dig out the diary and log in to Blackboard…what’s my password again?

Set goals

Somehow I’ve managed to erase all memory of PAD submission day, which seems like ages ago now, but I remember that we were asked to set some goals for the year ahead. I’ve just had a look back at mine and they actually make some sense. Personal development plans can sometimes seem like a bit of a box-ticking exercise, but having a goal in mind for second year will give you something to focus on and makes the time fly by.

Avoid stress

When I started this course, I made a pact with myself not to leave everything to the last minute. In my last degree, I tactically worked out my words/per hour ratio (about 400), convincing myself that it was totally fine to leave a 3,000 word essay to 24 hours before the deadline. Yeah, I always got them in, but I was an absolute wreck. Believe me, its not worth the stress. This degree is full on enough as it is, so help yourself out by starting early.

Oh and this applies to overcommitting too – a lesson I’ve learnt the hard way. Figure out what is really important and realise that it’s ok to say ‘no’ sometimes. I still haven’t mastered it, but it’s a work in progress.

Talk it out

Chances are that most of us will feel down at some point over the year, but if ‘the blues’ hit, don’t bottle it up.  With hundreds of student nurses about, you’re bound to find a kind, listening ear and you might find that others are feeling the same way.

Also, don’t forget the PEFs are there to address any issues you might be having on placement – take a look at this blog to find out more about their role and how they can help.

Remember it’s not all about nursing

Maybe it’s just me, but does nursing have a way of taking over your life? While on placement, it feels like you think, breathe, dream nursing – sometimes you just need to switch off. Step away from the stethoscope and plan some totally non-nurse activities for the weekend. A break will do wonders.

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Keep calm and carry on nursing

Conquering second year and banishing those blues is about finding the right balance. This course can take over if we let it, but by staying organised and making time for the other things we love, we can actually be better nurses in the long run.

See you next week!

Out on Placement

Guest Blog written by Emma Wilkes


I think it’s fair to say that most student nurses are nervous before starting a new placement, however LGBT students may feel extra nervous. Whether it’s awkward conversations about your love life, or a worry about what toilets it’ll be ok to use, it’s totally understandable. As a student nurse every new placement involves another coming out and this can be nerve wracking and emotionally difficult.

So here are five tips to survive coming out at placements:11049526_536723163136072_4031043654954708270_o

  1. Don’t feel you have to out yourself immediately – there is no need to introduce yourself as Emma the lesbian and you shouldn’t feel under pressure to do so
  2. But also don’t feel you can’t come out, everyone talks about their partners and children and you should be able to do the same.
  3. You don’t have to tell everyone, it’s ok to just tell people in conversation and leave those who weren’t there to work it out for themselves
  4. If you have any problems or concerns talk to your AA, mentor or PEF, they are there to support you and you should never face any discrimination on the grounds of your sexuality or gender identity
  5. Don’t be embarrassed, be proud of who you are, you have a unique life experience which will be valuable to you in nursing

The University LGBT society have lots going on, although it won’t always be possible to make their Wednesday group they also have things going on in the evenings and weekends. In Manchester you’ll also find the LGBT Foundation who have lots going on and can offer lots of support.FENT__1432160698_here-if-need-us

DILP Week 4 – Switching Hats in Maternity!!

Well what a difference a day makes! Because I had my “weekend” on Thu/Fri last week and worked Sat/Sun in A&E, it was very strange waking up the next morning and starting as the new girl again in Maternity. Quite the change!

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All I new for sure was that I’d get to hold some babies – I was HYPED

I didn’t expect it to be drastically different actually. In my mind, rushing into either A&E or Maternity would involve a certain amount of stress, drama and concern. In fact, during the 40 hours I’ve been diligently posted in Maternity, only 3 natural vaginal deliveries have taken place. So my expectation of blood, guts and placenta flying all over the show twinned with concerned Fathers pacing around and screaming Mothers rushing into the ward, hasn’t come to fruition.

Mary Cooke, a Lecturer from our University explained to me this week that during her time in Sri Lanka she learnt about the 4 arms of Sri Lankan healthcare. These 4 arms are divided into:

  • “Western” Publicly available care
  • “Western” Private care (Me)
  • Ayurvedic Medicine
  • Rural Folk Medicine

 

Public care, or the Sri Lankan version of the NHS is extremely thinly stretched across the country. My friends in Anurhadapura have been working (with Work the World) at one such hospital that has open-air wards of 60 beds which has one bar of soap for the entire ward. These institutions do an amazing job with what they’re given and treat a huge number of patients who otherwise would have to rely on traditional Sri Lankan remedies.

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Dhanvantari, God of Ayurveda

Ayurvedic Medicine has a history of over 3,000 years in Sri Lanka and is based around the balancing of 8 components to bring about physical and mental wellness. Treatments range depending on the ailment but can vary from “surgical” intervention to use of chiropractic massage.

Folk medicine is becoming increasingly rare as the country develops but involves treating ailments such as snake or insect bites, infections and such like using herbal and natural remedies.

Private Healthcare in Sri Lanka is the closest to hospitals in the UK you can get here. Therefor patients I see have a source of income that allows them to be there but again there are levels within this. For example the Presidential Suite on the top floor of my hospital costs around £350 per night and has wifi, cable TV, a kitchen and en suite guest room. Or for around £30 a night you can stay in a non air-conditioned room and still see the same consultants, doctors, physios etc.

For whatever reason, which I haven’t quite got to the bottom of yet, C-sections are overwhelmingly popular. I could not count the number of caesarians that have happened during this week compared to the lowly 3 vaginal births. I think it is considered to be less risky and carries fewer consequences than vaginal delivery and equally also demonstrates a level of wealth.

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CTG scan – this can show us if Baby is getting distressed during contractions or has a depressed HR

The first vaginal delivery I witnessed was in the first hours of my second day in our CTG room (Cardiac Tocograph – a scanner that is used to track the babies heart rate and the Mother’s contractions simultaneously). Usually Mothers wait for 20 minutes for the CTG to be taken then move into a normal room but in this instance there was no time to be wasted in moving this Lady. She delivered a beautiful baby girl at 34 weeks (full term being 40 weeks), and I was privileged enough to hold her hand and support her throughout the difficult delivery. Because of the hastiness of the whole procedure, when it became apparent she required an episiotomy the consultant Obstetrician only had a few moments to quickly inject some lidocaine before, seconds later, taking some sterile scissors to her perineum. I have never been so in awe of the strength and power of the female body.

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Ouch – I’ve got no other words for it… at least none that I can write on this public platform

With, and I’m not exaggerating here, nothing more than a few high pitched gasps and squeals, even during her midline episiotomy, her glorious tiny little baby was delivered and I am very pleased to say, the little lady is still doing very well.

I’ve been trying to learn on my feet as much as I can about the processes of pregnancy and childbirth but I very much see why our Midwifery colleagues are always so hard at work. Things can change in an instant during labour and the differences between each case makes each birth spectacularly valuable to my rough and ready education in this area.

I could write all day about the differences I’ve seen in Maternity but I’ve got to save some juicy tit-bits for next week so I’ll finish up here.

But PLEASE ASK QUESTIONS!!!

I have an entire hospital full of people who are so helpful and open to answering any questions I have about healthcare, life and culture in Sri Lanka so please do drop us a comment on our Facebook page or email us at:

enhancingplacement@gmail.com

DILP Week 3 – A&E lessons learnt

This last week has absolutely flown by!! I’ve kept myself very busy both in and out of placement which has been tiring but so rewarding!

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Scans following the admission of a lady with drowsiness and weakness following loss of consciousness

I can now run triage efficiently and effectively on my own and have been working with some really great nurses for the last two weeks who have taught me a bit of singhalese in between tasks. Key phrases you need to know as a tourist e.g. What’s your date of birth? What is your pain scoring between 0-10? Etc.

I’ve managed to get all the nurses to ask the patient for pain scores now which is a really vital thing. I only realised they weren’t asking properly when a woman who couldn’t speak with the pain in her abdomen or open her eyes fully had a 5/10 for pain written on her triage documents.. I’m in no way saying this is the only time I’ve come across falsified pain scores, unfortunately. It wasn’t at all rare to see Ward rounding forms where all patients conveniently had a pain score of 0 on my first placement in the UK. It wasn’t the case of course but writing this down meant less paperwork and less hassling the already over worked doctors. So it was sort of left unsaid and when I did rounding a and was accurate with pain scores it was met with a general groan from the staff because they had to chase up altering patients analgesia.

Pain is such a vital symptom to understand – this should be evident by the fact that all of our hospitals have a devoted “Pain Team” of specialist nurses that are like ache whisperers.

Changes in pain, not just the score but the type or the frequency can be the biggest clue you get about what’s going on with your patient and if their records aren’t accurately reflecting this evolution of their pain then we have failed that patient. For example, a headache.

It can be cause my 101 different things but if the patient is complaining of a sharp throbbing headache associated with noise or lights and also has a rash on their abdomen.. This could be meningitis. This patient might require urgent interventions. Equally, they might be having an allergic reaction or be dehydrated. However, without going into the details, we are pretty much running blind.

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This is not where anyone wants to be is it?? 

Literally 3 hours ago as I write this a woman who originally came in suffering from loose stools for 4 days arrested! She started coughing up frothy pink sputum then her heart failed, I was lucky enough to assist in giving chest compressions and ambu-bagging her to keep oxygen pumping around her system.

I had no idea what to expect from the other staff members in such a high-pressure situation but the respect and trust they showed me was pretty moving.

Having the doctors from CCU direct their questions at me about the patient, as a humble Nursing Student, was really empowering. I’m also very pleased to say that the patient’s vitals were stable when she left our care to recover in CCU.

Experiences like that today just remind me how privileged I am to be able to not only be a Nurse but to have this opportunity to travel half way across the world and still be respected, trusted and appreciated for all the hard work I have put into the degree so far. Nursing has always been a great passion of mine and it’s a truly wonderful thing when you can see that that passion exists in Nurses across the world who will work tirelessly next to you for the good of each patient that needs our care.

Wounds, Wonderful Wounds!

I’ve now entered my third week of district nursing and let me tell you, it’s been an adventure. I realized on my first morning that wounds are the majority of the case load-which is perfect! I’ve wanted some hands on wound care experience for ages, and I’m a bit of a gore fan. All the nurses have also been very helpful in letting me get stuck in with the goriest of wounds, and the patients seem to be pretty happy with letting me do that too! After all, its not everyday that you see someone’s foot tendon exposed..

Thanks to this exposure to wound care, I’ve started to appreciate how nursing is an art and a science. The science comes from knowing your stuff. You need to be able to look at a wound  explain how well its healing, and what it looks like. It might be granulated, which means the wound is all red but dry. So the next stage is for the wound to epithelialize, where new skin grows back from the edges inwards.  And then there’s sloughy (pronounced sluth-e) wounds. This makes the wound look all white/yellow, caused by dead epithelial cells and white blood cells. Slough often makes a wound look quite bad. When I first saw one, I was a bit shocked that the nurse wasn’t overly worried!

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Granulated finger wound

The art comes from the practical side; dressing the wound. A lot of patients I’ve seen require their wounds to be packed, as it’s a cavity. This is to aid the healing process, and draw out the nasty stuff. I’ve packed a few wounds now, and its slightly scary but really interesting. The skill comes in ensuring you don’t pack it in too much, as you’ll be pulling it out next time!! (like unwrapping a surprise you weren’t sure you asked for).

And then there’s bandaging. From blue-line to bi-layer, it must make district nurses insanely good at wrapping presents! They can look at a wound and bandage it perfectly. I tried, believe me. I’m not very crafty, but with practice its doable! 

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Fashionable hats and pro-bandaging techniques

If you’ve had some interesting wounds on your placements or have any questions about district nursing, comment on our Facebook page or email us at enhancingplacement@gmail.com.