Mysterious midwife? Vs obstetric nurse

So at the end of this week I will have finished my nine week community placement and I am absolutely gutted! 😩

Community to me IS midwifery- community encompasses the entire midwifery continuum. From booking to postpartum the community midwife is highly skilled in all areas of midwifery. For those who are unaware of what a community midwife does an average day from personal experience is a full antenatal clinic dealing with a wide range of medical, social issues, recognising safeguarding problems- including domestic violence, mental health problems, poverty amongst many many more.

Postnatal home visits, parent education, meetings with multidisciplinary agencies, phone calls from colleagues, anxious women, the hospital…. the list goes on!!!!!!!

One of the most beautiful amazing things we get to advocate in community is homebirth. Indeed research tells us that giving birth in the comfort of your own home with your family, partner, home comforts round you increases oxytocin- the hormone of love, childbirth, bonding and feeding which will therefore lead to positive outcomes. Of course some women are not suitable and we throughly risk assess all women in our care at booking to determine plan of care for delivery, providing the woman with the most upto date evidence based practice.

Of late, being an avid tweeter I have become increasingly alarmed by a small but growing consensus of people who believe midwifery has no place in contemporary society. These people believe it to be an ideology, a fantasy, a dream concept. I was very disturbed to read one post attacking midwives for our quest to promote normal birth as being for our own selfish gains. Believing that promotion of normal birth, home delivery to be nothing more than a ridiculous ideology that no longer features in a medicalised world.

This is the very reason why I feel midwifery is not just underrepresented but STILL in 2017 the average joes’ knowledge of childbirth and maternity is so poor that it is very easy to whip up so much negative hype- particularly on the back of terrible tragedies such as morecombe bay.

Why is childbirth seen as such a mysterious entity??? Why compared to most industrialised countries do we have abysmal breastfeeding rates?

Who do we blame for the increasing trend towards the medicalisation of child birth and the entire maternity care package?

Its somewhat of a wicked problem but all I know is the role of the midwife is to show care and compassion, to recognise deviations from the norm and REFER!!, promote normal pregnancy and labour. To be a midwife you need to care, care about the woman you are looking after, the baby in utero. Our strive for normality in childbirth proves how much we care! We want the very best outcome for the gorgeous ladies and babies we look after.

So please help spread the word-……..Midwifery is a vocation not a cult!!!!

Top Tips for Your First Placement

 

There is only two weeks until the first year placements start!!! Not only has this made me super nostalgic (and panicky because I’m halfway through my degree now), but it gave me the idea to write down some top tips.

Be YOU. This may sound like the cheesiest advice ever, but it’s true. With every placement, I’ve started this year, I’ve been quiet and not myself at all for the first few weeks because I’m so nervous. But what I’ve (finally) learnt is that once I started acting like me, I felt so much more relaxed. Make jokes, smile, talk to your colleagues. The secret to making it through any shift, even when you’re not having a great day, is with the people you work with! PLUS, the more you act naturally on placement, the easier it will be to feel more and more like a proper nurse, not just some clown in a uniform.

Throw yourself into every opportunity (if you’re comfortable****). I made a habit of not saying no to any task that was handed to me, just so I could experience everything. Sure, I didn’t always want to walk down to the Pharmacy and ask (for the 8th time that day) where our medication was , but it helped! I got to know the hospital, understand the breadth of the role that the pharmacy has, and take a little breather from the business of the ward. Even boring tasks help you learn something, even if all you’ve learnt is I’m not a mad fan of this!

****Sometimes, you aren’t ready. There are times when you will be asked to do something (like giving an injection) and you might not feel ready. That is OKAY! Talk to your mentor, learn the methods and take some baby steps. You get to decide when you’re ready!

Don’t beat yourself up for making mistakes. They happen all the time. We are learning and working! You’ll do things wrong sometimes and that is okay. Whoever is teaching you should walk you through it anyway.

Talk about your day! One of my favorite times of day whilst on placement is going home and getting it all off my chest. Since I live with non-nurses, I often filter out the gory bits (bless them) but it really helps to process the day and reflect.

Get your paperwork sorted out on time! Both of my first-year placements involved me panicking because I didn’t talk to my mentor about paperwork. I thought it would make me look pushy. It doesn’t. 99.99% of the time, your mentor might have just forgotten or they might have a plan of their own. Just talk to them! If issues arise from there, talk to your PEF and AA.

And finally- GOOD LUCK! This journey is hard and can be frustrating, but there will be so many days when it’s so so worth it.

If anyone fancies trying their hand at blogging their experiences with placement, why not give us an email, a Facebook message or a tweet? We’re always on the lookout for more student nurse’s and midwives!

Tools of the Trade – Mental Health Nursing

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Assessment or screening tools are key to gathering a whole wealth of information from a client and they can often lead to them opening up about other or underlying issues that may be impacting on their health. How and what they answer can give you insight into their current feelings about things as well as provide a baseline of presentation to record any future changes and used to point towards treatment required. Being able to monitor someone’s recovery progress can help staff encourage and motivate a person, just as being able to monitor someone’s deterioration can help staff adapt treatment and interventions appropriately.

Tools are not always perfect and we have to work with them openly and carefully using them as a guideline to help support the treatment or diagnosis we provide. Below is a short list of the some of the assessment tools you might come across on placement;

The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) – Used for Anxiety & Depression can be used in community as well as hospital. It is a 14 question Psychological screening tool assessing the severity of symptoms.

Generalised Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-7) – Screening tool used to measure the severity of Generalised Anxiety Disorder. 7 questions that can be administrated by a health care professional or self-administrated by the client themselves.

The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) – Commonly used short assessment used for screening for any dementia or cognitive impairment concerns are suspected. It measures cognitive functioning, and can be used to monitor change. 11 item tool taking around 10 minutes to administer making it a quick and useful tool to use.

The Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination (ACE) –  Well validated assessment tool for clinic setting assessment of cognitive functioning. This measures cognitive domains including language, visuospatial, memory and attention.  Usage is usually in part with other screening tests such as blood test, ECG and MRI scan to inform a diagnosis.

The Liverpool University Neuroleptic Side Effect Rating Scale (LUNSERS) – Is a self-assessment tool for measuring the side-effects of antipsychotic medications. Red herrings are included to check the accuracy of the results. The 51 questions are based on true side effects with 10 being false  ones aim to help patients Identify, understand and gain awareness of side effects they could be experiencing.

The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) – A basic screening tool used to pick up the early signs of hazardous and harmful drinking and identify mild dependence and highlight if a need for assisted withdrawal is required.

There are many varied tools assessing risk used by health care professionals in all fields and in  a wide variety of settings. It is important practitioners should take care to always explain what is involved,  how long it will last and how they can help a patient and their treatment.

Using an assessment tool can help uncover more information about a patients situation and help to encourage conversation that could provide valuable information to inform their care is more personalised and help reduce risk.

Keep your assessment tool box handy and help patients access all areas in health care support.smile

An Interview with Ian Wilson – Mental Health Lecturer

word-cloud-ianIan Wilson, Honourary Teaching Fellow in the Mental Health Field has given us an early christmas present in the form of this amazing, honest interview about his specialist field – Mental Health, specifically discussing his work in the community with dually diagnosed service users (those with mental health and substance misuse diagnoses). This is a truly insightful piece with some wonderful tips and advice for all fields of Nursing.

ENJOY!!…

 

What do you enjoy most about working in the community?

I enjoy the autonomy of community work. I enjoy being truly collaborative with my service users and colleagues. I enjoy the flexibility and responsiveness that community work offers workers and their clients. I enjoy the equalization of the ‘power balance’ between professionals and service users that community work offers.

What do you enjoy most about working with the university?

Regular contact with students is undoubtedly the most rewarding part of my university job. I welcome the enthusiasm, creativity, professionalism and dedication to mental health nursing that I see students frequently displaying. Because of this student contact I am reassured about the future of my profession and reassured about the future of mental health services.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Mental Health Nurses today?

I believe that we MUST maintain and nurture our own professional identity as mental health nurses. We have a unique perspective and a unique therapeutic trust. Both of these things are a huge privilege. We must ensure that this is not diluted.

Even as Student Nurses we can sometimes neglect our own mental health, especially with dissertations looming, what advice would you give students struggling with university stress?

I manage my own stress through regular exercise. I also have a group of friends who I can trust. Some of them are nurses, most of them aren’t. I have different groups of friends for different aspects of my life; my ‘football’ friends; my ‘music’ friends; my ‘work’ friends; friends I’ve known for 40 years or more, friends who have only recently entered my life. I rely on them all for support and encouragement.

How has your role as a Mental health Nurse changed since you registered?

I commenced my career as an inpatient staff nurse (two years). I then moved into community mental health nursing and I’ve done that for 20 + years. During that time my roles have changed and my responsibilities have increased. However, my core values have changed surprisingly little. I would still recognize myself from 25 years ago!

What qualities make a great Mental Health Nurse?

Empathy, unconditional positive regard, honesty, therapeutic optimism, positivity, self-reflection, a genuine interest in other people’s lives, open mindedness, a sense of humour, resilience, resourcefulness, self-reliance.

What made you choose to work with those suffering from drug and alcohol misuse?

I have both personal and professional reasons for working with dually-diagnosed (both mental health & substance misuse) service users. Additionally, I find service users with ‘dual’ problems resourceful, resilient, insightful and challenging. This keeps me going!

f3766f876d143ea85bd35fb7b63cabaf731c5493-3-1.jpgWhat piece of advice would you give Mental Health Student Nurses today?

Take every opportunity that comes your way to promote non-stigmatising attitudes towards mental health service users. Promote acceptance and respect among your colleagues. Use evidence based practice wherever possible. Have confidence to stand up against poor practice whenever you encounter it. Always push to improve services and your own skills and knowledge as a nurse.

From your experience working with service users who smoke cannabis, have you seen a therapeutic effect from taking it as a method of self-medicating and not just for recreational use?

Yes. For instance, a man with bi-polar illness has been using cannabis to regulate his mood. He has been actively attempting to reduce his cannabis use but as soon as he starts to reduce, he experiences a relapse into distressing elevated mood. His answer to this currently is to attempt to grow his own cannabis, which, he hopes, will be high in cannabidiols (anti-psychotic and sedating) rather than high in THC (very psychosis inducing). He is proving to be partially successful. However, in my experience this is unusual. Most of the service users I’ve worked with for many years do not get a good therapeutic effect from cannabis. Quite the opposite in fact. For almost all service users with psychotic illnesses cannabis can be a disaster for their mental health prognosis.

What impact do you think there would be on mental health services if cannabis was to be decriminalised or legalised in the UK?

Taking cannabis misuse out of the legal system and into the healthcare system would enable those people who have problems with cannabis misuse to seek appropriate help and treatment. It would also remove it from the control of organized crime.

From your experience what role does excessive alcohol consumption play in the development of mental health disorders?

This is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. Demographically, 50% of people entering alcohol treatment services have a severe depressive illness. 20% of people have a psychotic disorder (Weaver et al 2003). Whether this is a consequence of drinking excessively, or whether drinking excessively is a causative factor in the development of illnesses is, of course, usually too complex to fully determine.

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Legal Highs come in all sorts of forms and can be bought on the high street

With the rise of “legal highs” and previously uncommon substances of abuse (such as ketamine) in Greater Manchester, has their been a notable shift in conditions patients suffer with as the popular drugs of choice have changed?

I believe that there is now no doubt that many of the newer substances, such as synthetic cannabinoids and highly potent stimulants such as PMA and methadrone are potentially far more dangerous to both physical and mental health. Synthetic cannabinoids, especially, appear to be very dangerous and unpredictable. However, their use, among mental health service users and people in general seems to be increasing year by year.

If you could give child/adult field nurses a few key points to convey to patients they may encounter that they believe might be struggling with drug or alcohol abuse what would they be?

  • Be honest but non-judgmental about peoples’ lifestyle choices
  • Encourage service users to discuss issues of substance misuse in an open and honest manner
  • Listen to what they tell you and find ways of reflecting back what they’ve said
  • Express empathy about their situation in relation to substance misuse. Be especially empathic about the difficulty their substance misuse is causing them and how it may be preventing them to achieve their goals
  • Seek permission to offer information which is neutral, up-to-date, and presented in an accessible form. Check out carefully what they make of this information
  • If they don’t want to change their current patterns of substance misuse, carry on discussing the issue in an open and honest manner, avoid arguing or persuading; offer harm reduction tips
  • Keep the door open to possible intervention in the future

A moment of CALM: de-stress with new wellbeing workshops for student nurses and midwives

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It’s well known that in order to properly care for others, we must first take care of ourselves. I’m sure many of us have shared that advice with our friends, family, patients or their carers, yet how good are we at following it ourselves?

As the term progresses and the list of assignments builds up, it is tempting to put our health and wellbeing on the back burner. There are so many competing demands, especially as many of us juggle uni work with part-time jobs, family commitments or other personal issues. It can be overwhelming at times: every student nurse I have spoken to has felt the pressure at one time or another, yet you can often end up feeling quite isolated, thinking ‘is it just me?’ Believe me, it’s not.

Don’t fear – help is at hand! After feedback from previous students, a brand new project has been set up to support students throughout the year. CALM has been designed been designed specifically for student nurses and midwives, aimed at tackling some of the regular issues we might face during the course.

On offer is a four week Mindfulness course starting this afternoon which will give an introduction to mindfulness and share techniques to cope with anxiety and stress. Mindfulness is about being present in the moment, switching off from the endless distractions and learning to calmly accept the emotions and thoughts that fill our minds. Over the four weeks you will be given an introduction to acceptance and be taught some simple stress-busting tips including how to carry out a body scan and breathing exercises. You will also learn how to recognise stress cycle and ways to build mindfulness into your everyday routine.

On top of that are drop-in sessions on money management, for practical tips on how to make your bursary and student loan go further, and a session on housing for anyone who wants advice on finding accommodation that fits our hectic schedules. A series of free sport and fitness classes are also in the works, so watch this space!

meditation-1000062_960_720Starting this afternoon, the Mindfulness course will run every Wednesday for the next four weeks between 1-2pm and there are a couple of one-off money management and housing sessions planned for the rest of this semester. You can book a place on any of the sessions here or contact Eve Foster at sso.intern@manchester.ac.uk – and if you’re interested in the Mindfulness course, it’s fine if you can’t make the first session today.

Don’t forget that the university also offer a fantastic counselling service and a massive range of wellbeing and relaxation courses, from daily meditation sessions to longer courses on low mood and self esteem. There are also plenty of online resources and apps like Headspace that can help you unwind and de-stress.

You don’t have to become a incense-burning zen master to build mindfulness into your everyday life. Mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe says in this TED talk that we only need to spend 10 minutes doing absolutely nothing to feel the transformative effects of mindfulness.

So kick back, switch off and just breath.

I’m a Newly Qualified Nurse! OMG!

So Now What?!?

For me? Well I  did it!!– I’ve qualified – Passed all my exams PADs all signed off.

I’m even lucky enough to have myself a job!! EEK!!

Wow! Looking back what an amazing three years at uni I’ve had. Its such a blur in regards of what I’ve learnt but such a feeling to say I’ve done it. Its had its ups and downs but looking back I know they have all helped me get where I am today – In my first job as a qualified nurse! WOW again! staff-nurse

So was it worth it – am I fully prepared for my job?? Yes and No would be my answer to that.

No – because is anyone ever ready and fully prepared for a job you barely know? Of course not!

Yes – because – well actually I’ve surprised myself how much I do actually know and how much I do actually remember! Even those first year lectures are still stored in my upstairs somewhere and come back to me when I need them. Yes of course I am talking at a very basic knowledge level here but recognising and accepting I am at the bottom rung again knowledge wise in my role is the best way to be. I’m very luck in that I have a great team around me who are supporting and encouraging my continuing learning in my chosen field because that’s what Its like – starting all over again but this time you are doing all the work, you are making those decisions (with support), you are a nurse!

Its an amazing feeling – and responsibility rolled into one.responsibility

So then there is this thing called Preceptorship – Some department areas it seems are more organised than others in how it all works and fits around new starters. The key to remember is we are all different, jobs and departments are different; just like it is in placements. Don’t compare what you are getting too much with others. Your preceptorship should suit your needs as well as the job you have.

Little information was provided to us about what happens once it’s all over and you enter the ‘real world of nursing’ but as we all know – everything is changing all the time, things are rarely the same twice.

In university, as previous students, we input our voice on things we felt were good, bad or ugly. We did our best to change things for future students. The same is to be said in healthcare as a profession. Everything is continuously assessed, evaluated and changed where necessary, to achieve the best standards for all those involved, workers and patients alike. So get used to it – it will happen.

Qualified life so far is scary but awesome. I feel like a student still in someways but when I make those important care plan decisions myself, I know my training has paid off and I am confident in my judgement. Expect the unexpected and believe in yourself and you got this!! smile

p.s. Pay the NMC as soon as you get your pin number through from uni ! It can be done online straightaway so start saving now!

How to beat second year blues

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With second year around the corner, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little apprehensive.

I’ve heard of the elusive ‘second year blues’ and worry that they might already be setting in. Despite having a year under our belt, the end goal somehow seems further away than at the beginning. We’re a year wiser, with a better idea of the challenges ahead…and let’s face it, we’re probably all a year poorer too. All things considered, its no wonder we might feel a bit down.

In the blissful ignorance of first year, I ignored second and third years warning us that we’d feel like this – turns out they were right! In a quest to ease my own anxieties, I’ve asked the for their tips for beating second year blues. Here’s what they said…

Get ahead

I know most of us have spend the last few weeks catching up on sleep, earning some pennies or reminding our friends that we still exist, but it’s worth having a look at what’s coming up. By second year, we’re expected to be independent learners, so its up to us to be proactive and find out what is in store for us over the next year. I’ve been putting it off, but it’s time to get organised, dig out the diary and log in to Blackboard…what’s my password again?

Set goals

Somehow I’ve managed to erase all memory of PAD submission day, which seems like ages ago now, but I remember that we were asked to set some goals for the year ahead. I’ve just had a look back at mine and they actually make some sense. Personal development plans can sometimes seem like a bit of a box-ticking exercise, but having a goal in mind for second year will give you something to focus on and makes the time fly by.

Avoid stress

When I started this course, I made a pact with myself not to leave everything to the last minute. In my last degree, I tactically worked out my words/per hour ratio (about 400), convincing myself that it was totally fine to leave a 3,000 word essay to 24 hours before the deadline. Yeah, I always got them in, but I was an absolute wreck. Believe me, its not worth the stress. This degree is full on enough as it is, so help yourself out by starting early.

Oh and this applies to overcommitting too – a lesson I’ve learnt the hard way. Figure out what is really important and realise that it’s ok to say ‘no’ sometimes. I still haven’t mastered it, but it’s a work in progress.

Talk it out

Chances are that most of us will feel down at some point over the year, but if ‘the blues’ hit, don’t bottle it up.  With hundreds of student nurses about, you’re bound to find a kind, listening ear and you might find that others are feeling the same way.

Also, don’t forget the PEFs are there to address any issues you might be having on placement – take a look at this blog to find out more about their role and how they can help.

Remember it’s not all about nursing

Maybe it’s just me, but does nursing have a way of taking over your life? While on placement, it feels like you think, breathe, dream nursing – sometimes you just need to switch off. Step away from the stethoscope and plan some totally non-nurse activities for the weekend. A break will do wonders.

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Keep calm and carry on nursing

Conquering second year and banishing those blues is about finding the right balance. This course can take over if we let it, but by staying organised and making time for the other things we love, we can actually be better nurses in the long run.

See you next week!