Mysterious midwife? Vs obstetric nurse

So at the end of this week I will have finished my nine week community placement and I am absolutely gutted! 😩

Community to me IS midwifery- community encompasses the entire midwifery continuum. From booking to postpartum the community midwife is highly skilled in all areas of midwifery. For those who are unaware of what a community midwife does an average day from personal experience is a full antenatal clinic dealing with a wide range of medical, social issues, recognising safeguarding problems- including domestic violence, mental health problems, poverty amongst many many more.

Postnatal home visits, parent education, meetings with multidisciplinary agencies, phone calls from colleagues, anxious women, the hospital…. the list goes on!!!!!!!

One of the most beautiful amazing things we get to advocate in community is homebirth. Indeed research tells us that giving birth in the comfort of your own home with your family, partner, home comforts round you increases oxytocin- the hormone of love, childbirth, bonding and feeding which will therefore lead to positive outcomes. Of course some women are not suitable and we throughly risk assess all women in our care at booking to determine plan of care for delivery, providing the woman with the most upto date evidence based practice.

Of late, being an avid tweeter I have become increasingly alarmed by a small but growing consensus of people who believe midwifery has no place in contemporary society. These people believe it to be an ideology, a fantasy, a dream concept. I was very disturbed to read one post attacking midwives for our quest to promote normal birth as being for our own selfish gains. Believing that promotion of normal birth, home delivery to be nothing more than a ridiculous ideology that no longer features in a medicalised world.

This is the very reason why I feel midwifery is not just underrepresented but STILL in 2017 the average joes’ knowledge of childbirth and maternity is so poor that it is very easy to whip up so much negative hype- particularly on the back of terrible tragedies such as morecombe bay.

Why is childbirth seen as such a mysterious entity??? Why compared to most industrialised countries do we have abysmal breastfeeding rates?

Who do we blame for the increasing trend towards the medicalisation of child birth and the entire maternity care package?

Its somewhat of a wicked problem but all I know is the role of the midwife is to show care and compassion, to recognise deviations from the norm and REFER!!, promote normal pregnancy and labour. To be a midwife you need to care, care about the woman you are looking after, the baby in utero. Our strive for normality in childbirth proves how much we care! We want the very best outcome for the gorgeous ladies and babies we look after.

So please help spread the word-……..Midwifery is a vocation not a cult!!!!

Working with the MDT

I am currently based on an acute respiratory ward and am having the time of my life working with the huge multidisciplinary team (MDT).

Why is the MDT important?
In both primary and secondary health care settings there is an emphasis placed on great interdisciplinary working in delivering effective treatment in a timely manner. If this team is not built on trust, effective communication and a good working relationship then they can act as barriers in delivering effective treatment and care. With the demand in the health services increasing, the need and pressures for interagency teamwork is also increasing.

What does this mean for you?
You, as a future registered nurse will be the backbone of the team. Yes you! The nurse seems to have six arms, a brain the size of a watermelon and apparently a bladder like a camel. You will be the key element in linking all the members of the teams together. You have the most patient contact. It is imperative that you develop your communication skills in order to be the driving force in increasing the collaboration between different team members. Are you excited yet?

What does it mean for you as a student nurse?
It is never too early to start working with the MDT now. I know it is daunting; I still hyper-ventilate when a consultant/doctor asks me a question about a patient I am looking after. AND I am a third year! I still panic when I answer the phone and it is the bed manager asking me what our status is. When the dietician changes the nutrition plan and hands over to me because the nurse is occupied. When the physiotherapists, occupational therapist, social worker and all the rest of the MDT ask me any question. I always think I will give a wrong answer or information that may have changed since I last on shift. So yes, I understand we have all been there.

What can you do to overcome these issues?
On my current placement, I have had the chance to put my MDT skills to practice. On my first day, members of the team were introduced to me. I became acquainted with them by having a casual conversation, this eased my anxiety and I became familiar with them. I was asked multiple times to pass on messages, to ask for a drug to be prescribed, to find out the plan for patient X and by the time I knew it my anxieties soon faded away. I began asking the MDT questions regarding their role in the care for my patient, I asked questions regarding my patients care and even requested to be present when they did their assessments.

What can you take away from this post?
1. Ask to be present when the MDT’s are carrying out their assessments because you will understand more about their role and know your patients capabilities. Did you know you can even spend a WHOLE day with them? YES! Spoke = spending a day with a member of the MDT to understand their roles.
2. Your trust and respect will increase with regards to their contribution to getting your patient discharged safely. Furthermore, you will be able to appreciate the pressures they are also under to meet the same objective as you are.
3. Finally, you will lose any anxieties or awkwardness you may have with approaching your team members. Always begin: Hi, my name is Shayma (obviously you would say your name not mine Hopefully unless you are too anxious 🙂 )

I for one have overcome my barriers and anxieties. And if in doubt, fake confidence and hide your anxiety until you make it, we all do it at one point!
That’s it from me, Good luck working with the MDT and please share your experiences with us!

Scary new experience?

After my first week in A&E, I had a sort of epiphany. A realisation that I probably should have had sooner – better late than never though I guess!

Though this is more a state of fact than advice, I believe it’s worth writing about to enforce the idea for students either just entering practice, or returning 2nd/3rd year students that may feel the added pressure and expectation from staff.

We are student nurses, we are in practice not to fill staffing numbers, or to be ignored, but instead to learn. We are going to come across new things that we are not always prepared for, we are going to be asked to perform jobs we’ve never done before and we are going to see things that we are unaccustomed to. Trying to learn, help patients and also work within our competency limits is a skilful juggling act that we all become experts in. However, though we love to be students and learn new things, it doesn’t stop us getting that anxious ball in our chest or the extra shine to our faces when it’s a brand-new experience.

To get to the point… Whilst in A&E this week I saw my first emergency situation, it was around 6am when we got that call from the Paramedics and I have to admit I got nervous! All these thoughts went through my mind like ‘what if my presence interrupts care?’ and ‘what if they ask me to get something and I don’t know where that is?’ I hope I’m not the only one who worries about these things.

The patient was going to arrive in 5 minutes, clock is ticking, heart is pounding. I’m looking to my mentor for guidance, she’s looking at me with reassurance and then the patient is brought through the doors into resus. I’m trying to take everything in, first looking at the patient’s presentation, then the parent’s reaction to the scenario. I thought about how this must look to them, their child out of reach, people rushing around them, alarms buzzing, lights flashing, indistinguishable equipment being used. Within seconds my attention went to the wonder of this team, everyone so confident in their role, assured in their tasks and skilled through practice. I became involved in this team in my own time, taking over observations and documentation when appropriate.

After the stabilisation of the patient I stood back and that’s when it hit me, what was I so nervous about? Why was I so nervous for this new experience? I am a student nurse, I am not counted in their staffing numbers, I am not expected to take over care because well, I’m not needed to. This brilliant medical team ensured this patients survival. I had been worried about being put in terrifying situations where I would be a hindrance to care due to my lack of experience in this area. That was never going to happen. I suddenly felt this weight leave my shoulders and felt the need to reassure other students who may be having similar worries. We are students, we are here to learn and staff understand this. It is always scary being in a new situation or being asked to perform a task for the first time. However, we should get comfort from the fact it is ok not to know the answers, it is okay to want to step back and watch if unsure. It does not matter if we are in a new experience because the professionals around us are experienced, we are here to learn. So, we should always say yes to experiencing something new! We should all simply remember, if we do not know an answer that’s ok, if we’re nervous that’s expected. Just be honest with your team, because everyone in this team has been a student too.

Top Tips for Your First Placement

 

There is only two weeks until the first year placements start!!! Not only has this made me super nostalgic (and panicky because I’m halfway through my degree now), but it gave me the idea to write down some top tips.

Be YOU. This may sound like the cheesiest advice ever, but it’s true. With every placement, I’ve started this year, I’ve been quiet and not myself at all for the first few weeks because I’m so nervous. But what I’ve (finally) learnt is that once I started acting like me, I felt so much more relaxed. Make jokes, smile, talk to your colleagues. The secret to making it through any shift, even when you’re not having a great day, is with the people you work with! PLUS, the more you act naturally on placement, the easier it will be to feel more and more like a proper nurse, not just some clown in a uniform.

Throw yourself into every opportunity (if you’re comfortable****). I made a habit of not saying no to any task that was handed to me, just so I could experience everything. Sure, I didn’t always want to walk down to the Pharmacy and ask (for the 8th time that day) where our medication was , but it helped! I got to know the hospital, understand the breadth of the role that the pharmacy has, and take a little breather from the business of the ward. Even boring tasks help you learn something, even if all you’ve learnt is I’m not a mad fan of this!

****Sometimes, you aren’t ready. There are times when you will be asked to do something (like giving an injection) and you might not feel ready. That is OKAY! Talk to your mentor, learn the methods and take some baby steps. You get to decide when you’re ready!

Don’t beat yourself up for making mistakes. They happen all the time. We are learning and working! You’ll do things wrong sometimes and that is okay. Whoever is teaching you should walk you through it anyway.

Talk about your day! One of my favorite times of day whilst on placement is going home and getting it all off my chest. Since I live with non-nurses, I often filter out the gory bits (bless them) but it really helps to process the day and reflect.

Get your paperwork sorted out on time! Both of my first-year placements involved me panicking because I didn’t talk to my mentor about paperwork. I thought it would make me look pushy. It doesn’t. 99.99% of the time, your mentor might have just forgotten or they might have a plan of their own. Just talk to them! If issues arise from there, talk to your PEF and AA.

And finally- GOOD LUCK! This journey is hard and can be frustrating, but there will be so many days when it’s so so worth it.

If anyone fancies trying their hand at blogging their experiences with placement, why not give us an email, a Facebook message or a tweet? We’re always on the lookout for more student nurse’s and midwives!

A moment of CALM: de-stress with new wellbeing workshops for student nurses and midwives

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It’s well known that in order to properly care for others, we must first take care of ourselves. I’m sure many of us have shared that advice with our friends, family, patients or their carers, yet how good are we at following it ourselves?

As the term progresses and the list of assignments builds up, it is tempting to put our health and wellbeing on the back burner. There are so many competing demands, especially as many of us juggle uni work with part-time jobs, family commitments or other personal issues. It can be overwhelming at times: every student nurse I have spoken to has felt the pressure at one time or another, yet you can often end up feeling quite isolated, thinking ‘is it just me?’ Believe me, it’s not.

Don’t fear – help is at hand! After feedback from previous students, a brand new project has been set up to support students throughout the year. CALM has been designed been designed specifically for student nurses and midwives, aimed at tackling some of the regular issues we might face during the course.

On offer is a four week Mindfulness course starting this afternoon which will give an introduction to mindfulness and share techniques to cope with anxiety and stress. Mindfulness is about being present in the moment, switching off from the endless distractions and learning to calmly accept the emotions and thoughts that fill our minds. Over the four weeks you will be given an introduction to acceptance and be taught some simple stress-busting tips including how to carry out a body scan and breathing exercises. You will also learn how to recognise stress cycle and ways to build mindfulness into your everyday routine.

On top of that are drop-in sessions on money management, for practical tips on how to make your bursary and student loan go further, and a session on housing for anyone who wants advice on finding accommodation that fits our hectic schedules. A series of free sport and fitness classes are also in the works, so watch this space!

meditation-1000062_960_720Starting this afternoon, the Mindfulness course will run every Wednesday for the next four weeks between 1-2pm and there are a couple of one-off money management and housing sessions planned for the rest of this semester. You can book a place on any of the sessions here or contact Eve Foster at sso.intern@manchester.ac.uk – and if you’re interested in the Mindfulness course, it’s fine if you can’t make the first session today.

Don’t forget that the university also offer a fantastic counselling service and a massive range of wellbeing and relaxation courses, from daily meditation sessions to longer courses on low mood and self esteem. There are also plenty of online resources and apps like Headspace that can help you unwind and de-stress.

You don’t have to become a incense-burning zen master to build mindfulness into your everyday life. Mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe says in this TED talk that we only need to spend 10 minutes doing absolutely nothing to feel the transformative effects of mindfulness.

So kick back, switch off and just breath.

How to beat second year blues

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With second year around the corner, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little apprehensive.

I’ve heard of the elusive ‘second year blues’ and worry that they might already be setting in. Despite having a year under our belt, the end goal somehow seems further away than at the beginning. We’re a year wiser, with a better idea of the challenges ahead…and let’s face it, we’re probably all a year poorer too. All things considered, its no wonder we might feel a bit down.

In the blissful ignorance of first year, I ignored second and third years warning us that we’d feel like this – turns out they were right! In a quest to ease my own anxieties, I’ve asked the for their tips for beating second year blues. Here’s what they said…

Get ahead

I know most of us have spend the last few weeks catching up on sleep, earning some pennies or reminding our friends that we still exist, but it’s worth having a look at what’s coming up. By second year, we’re expected to be independent learners, so its up to us to be proactive and find out what is in store for us over the next year. I’ve been putting it off, but it’s time to get organised, dig out the diary and log in to Blackboard…what’s my password again?

Set goals

Somehow I’ve managed to erase all memory of PAD submission day, which seems like ages ago now, but I remember that we were asked to set some goals for the year ahead. I’ve just had a look back at mine and they actually make some sense. Personal development plans can sometimes seem like a bit of a box-ticking exercise, but having a goal in mind for second year will give you something to focus on and makes the time fly by.

Avoid stress

When I started this course, I made a pact with myself not to leave everything to the last minute. In my last degree, I tactically worked out my words/per hour ratio (about 400), convincing myself that it was totally fine to leave a 3,000 word essay to 24 hours before the deadline. Yeah, I always got them in, but I was an absolute wreck. Believe me, its not worth the stress. This degree is full on enough as it is, so help yourself out by starting early.

Oh and this applies to overcommitting too – a lesson I’ve learnt the hard way. Figure out what is really important and realise that it’s ok to say ‘no’ sometimes. I still haven’t mastered it, but it’s a work in progress.

Talk it out

Chances are that most of us will feel down at some point over the year, but if ‘the blues’ hit, don’t bottle it up.  With hundreds of student nurses about, you’re bound to find a kind, listening ear and you might find that others are feeling the same way.

Also, don’t forget the PEFs are there to address any issues you might be having on placement – take a look at this blog to find out more about their role and how they can help.

Remember it’s not all about nursing

Maybe it’s just me, but does nursing have a way of taking over your life? While on placement, it feels like you think, breathe, dream nursing – sometimes you just need to switch off. Step away from the stethoscope and plan some totally non-nurse activities for the weekend. A break will do wonders.

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Keep calm and carry on nursing

Conquering second year and banishing those blues is about finding the right balance. This course can take over if we let it, but by staying organised and making time for the other things we love, we can actually be better nurses in the long run.

See you next week!

Suicide is everyone’s business

There were 6, 122 registered suicides in the UK in 2014 (ONS, 2016).

Today is National Suicide Prevention Day. This got me thinking about my experiences of suicide attempts in placement and what I have learned, which I wanted to share with you.

I am a student children’s nurse… I know, suicide in children’s nursing?! Yes, children and young people take their own lives. Notice I didn’t say ‘commit suicide’? Well-spotted. This was intentional. Now, it’s not easy to break our language habits, but I’ve found that a good start in communicating with people who have attempted suicide (or any vulnerable person, or, well… people) is to think carefully about what I’m saying. The word ‘commit’ is commonly used in reference to criminal activity, which ties it to negativity, so I prefer not to use that word. I recognise I used the word ‘attempt’ above. Is this word associated with failure? I don’t know. I’m still learning.

During my time on placement, I have observed how well staff respond to these children and young people in a clinical sense, and how they are still learning how to provide emotional and psychological support.

My first experience was with a young person with diabetes who intentionally missed insulin doses and miscalculated insulin doses in an effort to end her life. The nurses were open about their discomfort in communicating with her. I respected their honesty and, from this point, made it my objective to build my knowledge of communicating compassion in these situations. I started by sitting and talking with her. More importantly, I listened.

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Fast forward a few months and I am with a girl who has taken an overdose on the ward. This was an emergency. The charge nurse raised his voice and forcefully asked what she had taken. She stayed silent. Another student and I took a different approach. She held her hand and I asked people to stand back.

We introduced ourselves, explained she wasn’t in trouble and that we cared about her.

Somehow, we got to a point where we were singing and dancing to Justin Bieber in her bay, with the curtains closed enough to give her some privacy and open enough for staff to monitor. We listened to her and gave her our time. She disclosed to us what she had taken and she was treated. She was referred to CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service). She thanked us sincerely.

Following this incident, I asked staff which they felt was the best approach, given it was an emergency. Opinion was divided. What do you think?

I could write on and on about suicide prevention, but for now I have listed some of my top tips:

  • Refrain from judgement. If you can admit to yourself that you can be a little judgemental, that shows great level of self-awareness and highlights an area of self-development. For now, try to disguise your judgement. Think about how eye-rolling, tutting and slumping your shoulders whilst turning your back (yes, I have observed these in practice) could make somebody feel – Remember the first standard of the Code ‘treat people with kindness, respect and compassion’
  • Actively listen. Show you’re listening; make eye contact, nod with understanding…
  • Sometimes there are no ‘right’ words, but think about how your language could make someone feel.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask. ‘Are you feeling suicidal?’ ‘Would you like to talk?’ ‘Is there anything I might be able to do to help?’…
  • Don’t make promises you cannot keep. If you feel someone is at risk, make it clear you will need to share information confidentially with appropriate colleagues/services.
  • Know who to refer to and what support is available. You are a student, so at this stage it would be your mentor you would raise concerns with, but learn trust safeguarding policies and national and local services. Here are some resources to get you started:

SamaritansMindStamp Out SuicideMaytree, Male-specific: The Calm Zone,

Young People: Papyrus, Children: Childline

  • Be open to learning ways to help vulnerable people who are considering suicide. One small action you make could save somebody’s life. Keep learning. Keep reflecting. As always, I recommend Twitter as a useful starting point:

#WSPD16 #WorldSuicidePreventionDay #ItsOkayToTalk #TalkThroughTheTaboo

Suicide is everyone’s business and you can make a difference.