Tops Tips for Staying Cool

As you have probably noticed, we’re currently experiencing a bit of a heatwave at the moment! This may mean ice cream and sunbathing for some, but for us student nurses it isn’t much fun! From stuffy uniforms and buses hotter than hell, to rushing around Image result for warm weatherensuring patients are hydrated whilst being dehydrated yourself.

So what the the top tips for staying cool in a heatwave?

  1. Sun cream!! Especially if you’re on community or commute via walking/cycling.
  2. Keep hydrated***. It’s obvious, and we all harp on about it, but the day will drag more and the heat will hit you harder if you don’t keep drinking cold water or juice. Make sure you have a bottle or jug nearby to remind you, or drink with your Image result for patient drinking waterpatients so you both get the benefit!
  3. Don’t over-exert yourself. You are the most important person to take care of in your life! Make sure you take regular little breaks for drinks + a sit down. I know it can be hard, but you’re no use to your patients if you aren’t on top form!
  4. Change into your uniform when you get to placement. It prevents you starting your shift in a sweaty mess, and allows your body to cool down on your way home.
  5.  Avoid too much caffeine. I know this sounds barbaric (I can’t survive a shift without coffee) but caffeine is a diuretic. That means you’re going to the toilet more, which leads to more water loss. Try not to overdo the coffee intake!
  6. Try and get some sleep! Nothing is going to make a hot day longer + harder than lack of sleep. If you need a fan, get one! I know I couldn’t cope without mine.
  7. ***Know the signs. Dehydration can be bad news, whether its staff or patients. Make sure you know the signs (headache, dry mouth, not urinating a lot) and keep an eye out. Let someone know if you or a patient is suffering.

Have you been coping with the heat? Send us any tips/tricks via email, Facebook or Twitter !

 

 

Pressure Sores 101

One of the most common nursing buzzwords- pressure sores (AKA pressure ulcers). They can be developed by anyone, and in a wide range of places on the body. As nurses (student or not!) it is our responsibility to report, treat and prevent them.

What is a pressure sore?

A pressure sore is an area of skin that has been deprived of oxygen, due to continuous pressure. This prevents the area of skin getting enough blood, causing the skin to “blanch” (become white due to lack of blood flow). This can then develop into varying degrees of tissue damage; ranging from grade 1 to 4 depending on the severity (NHS Stop the Pressure, 2009).

Grade 1-  skin is intact but blanching, may be some heat/oedema as well 

Grade 2- partial thickness skin loss, looks like an abrasion or a blister. 

Grade 3- full thickness skin loss, some fat may be visible. Possible ‘undermining’ or ‘tracking’ as there is usually depth, depending on the location. This depth can sometimes be covered by slough, which needs to be removed before proper grading can take place. 

Grade 4- full thickness tissue loss, with exposed bone or tendon. There tends to be undermining or tracking, depending on the location. 

Where do they crop up?

Areas that have a hard bony prominence are at risk of pressure sores. This is because they have the least amount of skin protecting itself.

What factors lead to a higher risk of pressure sores?

There are many factors that increase the risk of pressure sores:

  • poor circulation – this could be caused by kidney problems, heart diseases or diabetes.
  • reduced/no mobility- it doesn’t have to be long term! even short term loss of mobility (e.g. after an operation) leads to a pressure ulcer risk.
  • friction- this is where good practice comes in. People who transfer frequently between bed-hoist-chair or just bed-chair, and being moved up/down a bed are at risk. This is why we use slide sheets!

How can they be treated?

  • regular re-positioning/ turns are vital! This helps distribute the pressure, and reduce the risk of the pressure sore from getting worse. You must assess whether the patient is able to do this themselves, or if they require help. Asking the patient (if they have capacity) is always best.
  • pressure relieving devices such as airflow mattresses or pressure cushions can be obtained through physiotherapists, occupational therapists, some trusts require nurses to send the referrals (depends on the area).

  • regular cleaning of the area. Special washes can be used such barrier creams or sprays like ‘Sorbaderm’. This is especially useful for pressure sores on the buttocks/sacrum as they are subjected to lots of moisture.
  • dressings! There are a wide range of dressings which can be used on pressure sores, those that have foam are good for extra protection.

 

How can they be prevented?

Similar to the above treatment! Encourage your patient to mobilize frequently (if possible) and explain the reasons why. Those who are at risk will be identified by their Waterlow Score (10+). If in the community and the patient has carers/relatives helping with their care, speak to them and ask them to update you on any concerns re: pressure sores. Completing bodymaps whenever a new patient arrives and update it regularly is also important. This allows you to assess the patient’s skin integrity, and keep an eye on any possible developments.

 

If you have any ideas for another ‘101 guide’, please get in contact via facebook, twitter or email us on enhancingplacement@gmail.com.

 

 

WeNurses takeover!

From Friday 25th May at 7am, I will be curating the WeNurses twitter account for 48 hours!

This is part of a wider project set up by fellow student nurses from other universities. On the last weekend of every month, a student nurse will takeover the well known twitter account! Students healthcare professionals are the future of healthcare, so why not give them a voice? This curation gives student nurses the chance to engage with a huge range of people and professions from all over the world, in 48 hours.

For my curation, I will be focusing on what its like to be a student nurse and the responsibilities required. I’ll also be talking about social media; positives, negatives and of course the use of reflective blogs!

Throughout my curation, I will be following the THINK SOCIAL and NMC Social media guidance.

If you have any questions, please tweet/facebook message/look us up on Instagram/email us on enhancingplacement@gmail.com.

What can nursing give to me?

Becoming a student nurse can consume you. With placement and academic work mixed together, it can often feel like all you do is nursing! On top of that, we often focus on what you can do for nursing. But what about what nursing can offer for you?

Recently, I’ve opened my eyes and seen the reciprocity within nursing. It started with my Nursing Therapeutic module, where we’ve been learning about Muetzels model who says that a therapeutic relationship between a patient and their nurse requires three components. These include: partnership, intimacy and reciprocity. Since we explored how a therapeutic relationship could benefit both the patient and the nurse, I thought maybe nurses get more out of their career choice than I thought?

Confidence! Going into placement takes guts. You are literally throwing yourself into new situations with new people everyday, and that takes a certain amount of confidence. Speaking to the wider MDT use to fill me with dread, but now I basically chasing them around for questions. This has reflected into my personal confidence A LOT. I am more sure of myself, and what I want to get out of situations.

unknown-2Time management. I thought I was organised before I came to uni. I was wrong. I feel I’ve reached a higher-level, as uni has forced me to gain the ability to spread out my work so I’m not over-exerting myself. It’s a VERY good skill, as it’s very easy to become burnt out. Spreading out work helps you fit in the other important stuff that isn’t necessarily related to nursing/uni but is absolutely vital! Get yourself a fab diary and a calendar life will become easier.

Problem-solving. I recently attended an inter-professional workshop with our lovely midwives all about the health needs of refugees. Once we were put into teams, it was like somnurses and midwiveseone lit a spark! Suddenly, adult nurses + midwives + child nurses + mental health nurses were able to outline all these potential solutions to the fictional family we were ‘caring for’. We were more than able to use our combined knowledge to solve the situation with ease!

Honesty. Before uni, I would often be told to do something at work/school and just nod endlessly until they told me to go and do it. What would happen? I would have literally no idea what I was meant to be doing. You can’t really do that in nursing, so you end up asking more questions and understanding where you need support. This not only shows honesty, but it shows a lot of maturity as well.

This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but its great to reflect back on how you’ve grown. I would urge any of you to do the same! Not only is it a useful skill for interviews, but it really helps with realising why this degree is so worth it.

What has nursing given to you? Comment, tell us on facebook/twitter or send us an email!

Social Media Savvy

How many times have you been told about “the dangers of social media”? “It’s online forever!”, or my personal favorite “Just don’t put anything on social media and you won’t have any problems!”. Too often it is portrayed as negative, and it is assumed that social media is an evil within nursing. But is it?

social-media

“Look at this silly cat picture”

I am a total social media enthusiast. I’ve used it for well over 10 years now, freely posting funny cat pictures and what I’d had for dinner. But becoming a student nurse altered my habits. I changed my name on Facebook to keep it more private, and ensured that my social media platforms didn’t show my name. I felt as if everything I said may impact my career. That lasted for about an hour on twitter, as I then discovered the huuuge nursing platform available to me! By engaging with twitter chats, reading articles and following other nurses I felt I was part of a wonderful community! The amount of support I have received has been amazing- and I encourage you all to get involved!  Twitter is incredibly easy to use, and you can create an account that can be used purely for nursing.

safety-first

Completely appropriate and accurate picture to post 

We should be aware of social media. Many student nurses are part of the generation who grew up with it (like myself) so why shouldn’t we embrace it?

There are, of course, cautions. Many nursing-related accounts post really helpful tips of how to stay appropriate on social media. They include tips like: don’t post anything about patients/their relatives/where you work , don’t use offensive language, be kind and don’t try find patients on social media. Pretty simple right? They aren’t horrible scary rules, and (hopefully) don’t put you off getting social media savvy!

If you want to check out some nursing social media, take a look at these: our Facebook page, our Twitter page, NURSOC education which is fab, surviving student nursing is great for some laughs, the UoM BNurs and Midwifery twitter and of course We Nurses!!

For more social media guidance please visit: the NMC, RCN and everynurse to keep yourself safe and professional!

Top Tips for Your First Placement

 

There is only two weeks until the first year placements start!!! Not only has this made me super nostalgic (and panicky because I’m halfway through my degree now), but it gave me the idea to write down some top tips.

Be YOU. This may sound like the cheesiest advice ever, but it’s true. With every placement, I’ve started this year, I’ve been quiet and not myself at all for the first few weeks because I’m so nervous. But what I’ve (finally) learnt is that once I started acting like me, I felt so much more relaxed. Make jokes, smile, talk to your colleagues. The secret to making it through any shift, even when you’re not having a great day, is with the people you work with! PLUS, the more you act naturally on placement, the easier it will be to feel more and more like a proper nurse, not just some clown in a uniform.

Throw yourself into every opportunity (if you’re comfortable****). I made a habit of not saying no to any task that was handed to me, just so I could experience everything. Sure, I didn’t always want to walk down to the Pharmacy and ask (for the 8th time that day) where our medication was , but it helped! I got to know the hospital, understand the breadth of the role that the pharmacy has, and take a little breather from the business of the ward. Even boring tasks help you learn something, even if all you’ve learnt is I’m not a mad fan of this!

****Sometimes, you aren’t ready. There are times when you will be asked to do something (like giving an injection) and you might not feel ready. That is OKAY! Talk to your mentor, learn the methods and take some baby steps. You get to decide when you’re ready!

Don’t beat yourself up for making mistakes. They happen all the time. We are learning and working! You’ll do things wrong sometimes and that is okay. Whoever is teaching you should walk you through it anyway.

Talk about your day! One of my favorite times of day whilst on placement is going home and getting it all off my chest. Since I live with non-nurses, I often filter out the gory bits (bless them) but it really helps to process the day and reflect.

Get your paperwork sorted out on time! Both of my first-year placements involved me panicking because I didn’t talk to my mentor about paperwork. I thought it would make me look pushy. It doesn’t. 99.99% of the time, your mentor might have just forgotten or they might have a plan of their own. Just talk to them! If issues arise from there, talk to your PEF and AA.

And finally- GOOD LUCK! This journey is hard and can be frustrating, but there will be so many days when it’s so so worth it.

If anyone fancies trying their hand at blogging their experiences with placement, why not give us an email, a Facebook message or a tweet? We’re always on the lookout for more student nurse’s and midwives!

My day with the Health Visitors

As an adult student nurse, I don’t encounter many babies/children, so I was keen to try something a bit different. So when I found out that the Health Visitors were just down the corridor of my placement’s main office base, I soon popped my head in to organise a spoke! I had an absolutely wonderful day with the team! Not only did it help me understand the workings of the Community Multi-Disciplinary Team, but its exposure to another field of nursing! Plus, my current district nursing placement is largely based around treating patients, so observing some preventative public health care was great. Oh, and I got to play with some adorable children- I love being a student nurse!

Each Health Visitor is a qualified nurse (adult, child, mental health or learning disability!) or midwife, and their role is based around family care. By leading the delivery of the Healthy Child Programme, they ensure that expectant mothers and new babies up to the age of 5 get the best start in life! They visit families in their homes, GP clinics, Nurseries and Sure Start Centres. It’s an incredibly varied job.

pincer grasp

A tiny grasp for baby, a huge step for development!

My day with the Health Visitors started with a visit to a local SureStart centre, where the local ‘Baby Clinic’ is held. This is where one year old’s attend and the health visitors evaluate their progress. Its not as scary as it sounds, I promise!! They look for certain markers in a baby’s development and then, if needed, can give the parents pointers on how to help their child. For example, by the age of one they should be ‘babbling’ (repeating words they’ve learnt, usually nonsense), pulling themselves to stand and using furniture to wobble around on two feet, and using a pincer hand gesture. We had two lovely little babies visit us, both of which showed these developmental markers but at different stages. Each child, of course, is different and they have started to develop their personalities at this point. Our first baby was very outgoing and had his older sister to make him confident enough to play around and show us how well he was doing. The second child was a bit more shy, and preferred the company of her mum. However, after I showed her the wonder of some bells on a stick, she did everything we asked of her.

Alongside looking for the developmental markers, Health Visitors are also looking at the bigger picture. Their aim is to ensure that the family is happy, healthy and safe. How do you do this? Use a good old pyramid of course!

health visitor bible

Who doesn’t like a pyramid?

The Safeguarding and promoting welfare pyramid is designed to help pinpoint the areas which children should have. So, for example, if the Health Visitor detects that the child doesn’t seem like they have enough stimulation for the child to grow and enjoy themselves, that would question the parenting capacity. It’s useful for identifying a variety of factors that may be affecting a child’s development, as it’s never usually just one thing. Anything that is identified as missing can be worked on, via the Health Visitors, Social Workers or Family Support Workers.

If you want to learn more about Health Visitors, NHS England has a load of information about their role and how to become one! Or, if the chance arises, go and spend time with some!