Collaboration: the future of our NHS- #nurswivesunite

13151090_226356241076122_2131036156_nI write this not to highlight the negatives of our current NHS in crisis, but to address how we can collaboratively work together to save our glorious institution.

I don’t need to talk about our failing health service, I don’t need to talk about the millions of pounds needed from the money tree to keep our beloved institution a float. I don’t need to talk about what the NHS means to Britain and its people, I don’t need to talk about the pressures, the constraints we as healthcare professionals all face.

What we need to talk about is how we can change the future.  I don’t think I’m wrong in saying this is without question the hardest time ever to train to be a nurse or midwife.

We’ve lost our bursary, some of us have lost our passion, our dreams of delivering the care we want to.  Who do we thank for this? Is it a question of politics? Or has our health service just reached a tremendous plateau of increased life expectancy, a rise in population, increased complex care which have become a potent mix given the current economic climate.

How do we adapt?

Collaboration that’s how!

Collaboration– “A purposeful relationship in which all parties strategically choose to cooperate in order to achieve shared or overlapping objectives.”

I love this definition, it epitomises what I believe is at the heart of what we all signed up for; whether you are a student midwife or student nurse we all have overlapping goals, we all CARE.

 We all want to deliver the best care possible whereby it be to a baby on neonatal unit, an Alzheimer’s patient, a child, a patient on a high dependency unit, a labouring woman, they all deserve the same amount of care and compassion.

 We are governed by the code (NMC 2015), we all follow the code, are regulated by the code, we all follow the same overlapping objectives -care, compassion and empathy.

As a whole we are truely invincible.  We have the power to stand up and fight. We have the power to change OUR NHS !!!

Let’s get to know one another, the roles we represent, the care we provide and how we can support each other.  Once we are fully united then I believe we have the power to transform and adapt to the future of our glorious glorious service.

 

Election time: Will Britain vote for more zombie capitalism?

Left in New Zealand

Despite Jeremy Corbyn’s courageous fightback in the lead up to this election and a slim chance of victory, I suspect by the morning of June 9th the population of the UK will have walked bewilderingly into 5 more years of Tory rule. A further half-decade of class warfare in which the 1% will continue to beat the peasants into submission with their bonus cheques. We can expect more cuts to public services, further privatisaton of the NHS and ever widening inequality. Never fear, we will be saved by Theresa May as she has declared they will form a ‘strong and stable’ government. The question must be asked, for whom? Surely not the growing amount people who are now forced to use foodbanks just to get by. Certainly not the sick and disabled who have seen their benefits slashed, along with the unemployed. Theresa May I suspect won’t be fighting…

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Antenatal parent education- does it have a place in modern society?

ctmI adore parentcraft, why? Because I adore discussing the subject I love so very much. I love talking to women, their partners, their families about something which to them is unknown and very very scary.

Parentcraft is a funny thing! Some midwives adore it others can’t think of anything worse than “preaching” in front of a group of perspective parents.

It saddens me the lack of funding and hours the NHS invests into parent education. Year after year, maternity reports publish how important antenatal education is in facilitating positive mother and baby outcomes.  How discussing stages of labour, mode of delivery, pain relief, postnatal care and infant feeding to name a few are absolutely vital to achieving positive outcomes.

This week I was lucky enough to look after a lovely couple I had met in my parent craft classes.  Half way through her labour she told me how much she loved parentcraft and how informative it had been!! She recited aspects of the sessions I had spoken about including the stages of labour and the amazing oxytonic affects produced by feeling supported, loved in labour! I felt such a sense of achievement that the sessions had really helped the couple and I went on to deliver their beautiful baby girl!!!

I believe there is a place in today’s society for parent education but midwives must evolve and adapt in order to engage the audience. Nowadays information we all need is just a click away on an app or a search engine. But nothing beats a positive engaging face to face session.

I certainly won’t be shying away!!! I can not wait to get stuck into antenatal education when I qualify!! Spreading the word of the wonderful physiology of pregnancy, childbirth, infant feeding and much much more!!!!

 

 

Mysterious midwife? Vs obstetric nurse

So at the end of this week I will have finished my nine week community placement and I am absolutely gutted! 😩

Community to me IS midwifery- community encompasses the entire midwifery continuum. From booking to postpartum the community midwife is highly skilled in all areas of midwifery. For those who are unaware of what a community midwife does an average day from personal experience is a full antenatal clinic dealing with a wide range of medical, social issues, recognising safeguarding problems- including domestic violence, mental health problems, poverty amongst many many more.

Postnatal home visits, parent education, meetings with multidisciplinary agencies, phone calls from colleagues, anxious women, the hospital…. the list goes on!!!!!!!

One of the most beautiful amazing things we get to advocate in community is homebirth. Indeed research tells us that giving birth in the comfort of your own home with your family, partner, home comforts round you increases oxytocin- the hormone of love, childbirth, bonding and feeding which will therefore lead to positive outcomes. Of course some women are not suitable and we throughly risk assess all women in our care at booking to determine plan of care for delivery, providing the woman with the most upto date evidence based practice.

Of late, being an avid tweeter I have become increasingly alarmed by a small but growing consensus of people who believe midwifery has no place in contemporary society. These people believe it to be an ideology, a fantasy, a dream concept. I was very disturbed to read one post attacking midwives for our quest to promote normal birth as being for our own selfish gains. Believing that promotion of normal birth, home delivery to be nothing more than a ridiculous ideology that no longer features in a medicalised world.

This is the very reason why I feel midwifery is not just underrepresented but STILL in 2017 the average joes’ knowledge of childbirth and maternity is so poor that it is very easy to whip up so much negative hype- particularly on the back of terrible tragedies such as morecombe bay.

Why is childbirth seen as such a mysterious entity??? Why compared to most industrialised countries do we have abysmal breastfeeding rates?

Who do we blame for the increasing trend towards the medicalisation of child birth and the entire maternity care package?

Its somewhat of a wicked problem but all I know is the role of the midwife is to show care and compassion, to recognise deviations from the norm and REFER!!, promote normal pregnancy and labour. To be a midwife you need to care, care about the woman you are looking after, the baby in utero. Our strive for normality in childbirth proves how much we care! We want the very best outcome for the gorgeous ladies and babies we look after.

So please help spread the word-……..Midwifery is a vocation not a cult!!!!

Student midwife information services-From an educational and practical perspective

I seem to live, breath, eat and sleep midwifery!  Last thing before bed and the first thing I do in the morning is read the latest updates from Elsevier, Midwifery Journal, RCM, MIDIRS the list goes on!!!

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No amount of reading can ever be enough as a STMW.  As students we are adult learners, responsible for our own learning, expected to keep up to date with current research, information and clinical guidance.  There is so much to midwifery, I never truly appreciated the enormity of my vocation before starting my journey.

Information services are invaluable for our learning.   I am subscribed to many different learning tools and organisations.  One information service I find particularity invaluable is MIDIRS.

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‘Our Mission:
To be the leading international information resource relating to childbirth and infancy, disseminating this information as widely as possible to assist in the improvement of maternity care’ (MIDIRS 2016)

MIDIRS is an information and resource service for midwives and student midwives, keeping in touch with the latest up to date midwifery knowledge and research, hot topics and articles in midwifery as well as having an in-depth database of research.

‘MIDIRS – or the Midwives Information and Resource Service – is a not-for-profit educational charity providing effective information resources that help maternity health care professionals or students succeed in their professional development and studies.’ (MIDIRS 2016)

Publishing a journal/digest quarterly of the latest research studies and news so you can always rely on the fact the information in the journal is current and reliable information you can use in your studies.

Upon starting my degree I went out and bought umpteen midwifery textbooks, although my course requires me to use this literature, journal and database use is seen as extremely favourable by the university as it shows initiative, breadth and depth of knowledge and passion.  I strongly recommend any midwifery student or nursing student to use current databases and journals to keep up to date with your subject area, I find these invaluable to my practice, learning outcomes and knowledge as a STMW.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call the Midwife- I need a pinard!!!

Pinard’s- Funny horn like instruments that remind me of a trumpet.

Pinard’s- what are they? Pinard’s- why call it that?

These are the questions I first asked myself as a fresh 1st year shuffling through my clinical skills book. They want evidence of antenatal assessment using a PINARD!! 😇

Once I got into antenatal clinic I was introduced to the pinard, ahhhhhh I thought…. Call the midwife!!!! I reminisced back to the series, scenes of the nuns and midwives using these funny shaped horns , pressing into a woman’s bump to hear the baby’s heart beat. Ohhhh!!!!  So what is a pinard and how does it work?

The pinard was once called a fetostethoscope, before the days of the doppler or sonic-aid, midwives would use the pinard to listen for the FH- fetal heart. It was named a “pinard” after French obstetrician Adolphe Pinard.  A pioneer in perinatal and antenatal care, he specialisesed in palpation and fetal activity. In 1895 he invented the “pinard”.

I love the pinard- I see it as a right of passage, an essential authentic midwifery tool that has been replaced by technology.

 

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It amazes me how the midwives of the past used these simple yet effective stethoscopes to keep track of fetal development.

Nothing beats the feeling of actually finding the heart beat of a baby in clinic, I adore discovering the fetal position, listening to the fetal heart and with technological advancements women are now able to hear their baby’s heart too, the sound of a fetal heart is so soothing and it is lovely to see the women comforted by their babies ‘thud thuds’.

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I do however wish the pinard was used as frequently as a sonic-aid, it is a piece of midwifery history that I believe is just as important.  I took my pinard-

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(My pretty pink pinard!! 🙂

to antenatal clinic this week, determined to practice the art!!  When I heard a beautiful beat I was elated!!!  Safe to say I will be taking my pretty pink pinard with me on placement next week, determined to keep this historical practice part of my future practice.

I recommend visiting Sara Wickhams blog about pinard use, Pinard Wisdom – Tips and Tricks from Midwives (Part 1), fascinating read into pinard use.