Working with the MDT

I am currently based on an acute respiratory ward and am having the time of my life working with the huge multidisciplinary team (MDT).

Why is the MDT important?
In both primary and secondary health care settings there is an emphasis placed on great interdisciplinary working in delivering effective treatment in a timely manner. If this team is not built on trust, effective communication and a good working relationship then they can act as barriers in delivering effective treatment and care. With the demand in the health services increasing, the need and pressures for interagency teamwork is also increasing.

What does this mean for you?
You, as a future registered nurse will be the backbone of the team. Yes you! The nurse seems to have six arms, a brain the size of a watermelon and apparently a bladder like a camel. You will be the key element in linking all the members of the teams together. You have the most patient contact. It is imperative that you develop your communication skills in order to be the driving force in increasing the collaboration between different team members. Are you excited yet?

What does it mean for you as a student nurse?
It is never too early to start working with the MDT now. I know it is daunting; I still hyper-ventilate when a consultant/doctor asks me a question about a patient I am looking after. AND I am a third year! I still panic when I answer the phone and it is the bed manager asking me what our status is. When the dietician changes the nutrition plan and hands over to me because the nurse is occupied. When the physiotherapists, occupational therapist, social worker and all the rest of the MDT ask me any question. I always think I will give a wrong answer or information that may have changed since I last on shift. So yes, I understand we have all been there.

What can you do to overcome these issues?
On my current placement, I have had the chance to put my MDT skills to practice. On my first day, members of the team were introduced to me. I became acquainted with them by having a casual conversation, this eased my anxiety and I became familiar with them. I was asked multiple times to pass on messages, to ask for a drug to be prescribed, to find out the plan for patient X and by the time I knew it my anxieties soon faded away. I began asking the MDT questions regarding their role in the care for my patient, I asked questions regarding my patients care and even requested to be present when they did their assessments.

What can you take away from this post?
1. Ask to be present when the MDT’s are carrying out their assessments because you will understand more about their role and know your patients capabilities. Did you know you can even spend a WHOLE day with them? YES! Spoke = spending a day with a member of the MDT to understand their roles.
2. Your trust and respect will increase with regards to their contribution to getting your patient discharged safely. Furthermore, you will be able to appreciate the pressures they are also under to meet the same objective as you are.
3. Finally, you will lose any anxieties or awkwardness you may have with approaching your team members. Always begin: Hi, my name is Shayma (obviously you would say your name not mine Hopefully unless you are too anxious 🙂 )

I for one have overcome my barriers and anxieties. And if in doubt, fake confidence and hide your anxiety until you make it, we all do it at one point!
That’s it from me, Good luck working with the MDT and please share your experiences with us!

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