Raising Concerns

Whilst in practice, unfortunately, sometimes we can witness bad practice. It’s not a situation I would wish upon any student nurse or registered nurse for that matter as it immediately puts you in a very difficult position.

Yes, in the perfect world, there would be no internal conflict, you would identify the issue, escalate it to your manager or mentor and trust that it will be dealt with appropriately and with discretion and professionalism. However I know in my circumstance, I was/am struggling to trust that sharing my concerns will not impact upon my learning and education within this ward. This isn’t based upon anything other than my own fear of self-preservation, which makes it harder.whistleblowing

You’re faced with a decision, to voice your concerns and risk an uncomfortable and strained time in practice or say nothing and risk patient safety/dignity/pride. It really isn’t a toss up in my opinion.

The process is intended to be as pain-free as possible. Speak to the relevant individual, be it PEF, Ward Manager, Academic Advisor or Mentor and your concern should be dealt with in a professional and serious manner befitting the circumstance.

I have to say that as soon as I raised my concerns I felt an immediate sense of relief and confidence. Confidence that I had done the right thing for my patient, patient’s to come. I had 3 weeks remaining in my practice area and this was rather terrifying as I thought I would be identified somehow and treated poorly for raising concerns in practice, this I am very happy to report WAS NOT THE CASE. I wasn’t treated any differently whatsoever, I felt supported, trusted and above all I felt like the University was proud of me speaking up when I did.

This feeling was reinforced on Monday when placement allocations came out. A very close friend of mine has been allocated the same placement in which I experienced poor practice. I could have easily ignored the issues in the ward. Easily put them to the back of my mind and they would have continued and other Students would have struggled and felt as conflicted as me but because I spoke out – those issues have been resolved.handshake

I was able to say to my friend in confidence that any obstacles I encountered in practice have been resolved. No placement is perfect but if each student that encounters issues keeps quiet – they will never be perfect.

It can be very easy for student nurses to lay the blame for poor practice areas at their mentor’s feet but we have our part to play as well. Be honest in your placement evaluation and be honest with your mentor throughout your training – if they know what works well and what doesn’t that can only lead to improvements in how they teach and how you learn. So BE BOLD and SPEAK UP, who knows the number of people that will benefit from your honesty in the future.

PEF contact details can be found via this link:

http://sites.bmh.manchester.ac.uk/nursing-mentors/contacts

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