My day with the Health Visitors

As an adult student nurse, I don’t encounter many babies/children, so I was keen to try something a bit different. So when I found out that the Health Visitors were just down the corridor of my placement’s main office base, I soon popped my head in to organise a spoke! I had an absolutely wonderful day with the team! Not only did it help me understand the workings of the Community Multi-Disciplinary Team, but its exposure to another field of nursing! Plus, my current district nursing placement is largely based around treating patients, so observing some preventative public health care was great. Oh, and I got to play with some adorable children- I love being a student nurse!

Each Health Visitor is a qualified nurse (adult, child, mental health or learning disability!) or midwife, and their role is based around family care. By leading the delivery of the Healthy Child Programme, they ensure that expectant mothers and new babies up to the age of 5 get the best start in life! They visit families in their homes, GP clinics, Nurseries and Sure Start Centres. It’s an incredibly varied job.

pincer grasp

A tiny grasp for baby, a huge step for development!

My day with the Health Visitors started with a visit to a local SureStart centre, where the local ‘Baby Clinic’ is held. This is where one year old’s attend and the health visitors evaluate their progress. Its not as scary as it sounds, I promise!! They look for certain markers in a baby’s development and then, if needed, can give the parents pointers on how to help their child. For example, by the age of one they should be ‘babbling’ (repeating words they’ve learnt, usually nonsense), pulling themselves to stand and using furniture to wobble around on two feet, and using a pincer hand gesture. We had two lovely little babies visit us, both of which showed these developmental markers but at different stages. Each child, of course, is different and they have started to develop their personalities at this point. Our first baby was very outgoing and had his older sister to make him confident enough to play around and show us how well he was doing. The second child was a bit more shy, and preferred the company of her mum. However, after I showed her the wonder of some bells on a stick, she did everything we asked of her.

Alongside looking for the developmental markers, Health Visitors are also looking at the bigger picture. Their aim is to ensure that the family is happy, healthy and safe. How do you do this? Use a good old pyramid of course!

health visitor bible

Who doesn’t like a pyramid?

The Safeguarding and promoting welfare pyramid is designed to help pinpoint the areas which children should have. So, for example, if the Health Visitor detects that the child doesn’t seem like they have enough stimulation for the child to grow and enjoy themselves, that would question the parenting capacity. It’s useful for identifying a variety of factors that may be affecting a child’s development, as it’s never usually just one thing. Anything that is identified as missing can be worked on, via the Health Visitors, Social Workers or Family Support Workers.

If you want to learn more about Health Visitors, NHS England has a load of information about their role and how to become one! Or, if the chance arises, go and spend time with some!

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