Week 2 – DILP Questions Answered!

At the end of my second week working in a Sri Lankan hospital I am pretty exhausted. It’s been a really full on week; my first ever in A&E and it’s been absolutely invaluable. I’ve observed lots of amazing Nursing and care but can’t seem to keep myself from thinking “Oh, that’s not how we do it in England” every time something surprises me.

IMG_7797.JPGAfter last week’s post a few of you had some questions about the DILP and how myself and others went about it. Since I have organized my placement independently I referred to my friends currently working in Andhupura who have gone through Work the World for their DILP about their experiences too. They explaned that they chose Andhupura because it seemed to have a richer culture compared to Kandy and was near the beaches of Trincomalee which is one of Sri Lanka’s best preserved pieces of coast-line with clear blue waters and lots of snorkeling opportunities.

Firstly and often most crucially going abroad for this placement is an expensive undertaking. Going through an agency condenses all the costs however into one lump sum you pay directly to them to organize accommodation, flights etc. this can be paid in installments or in one go but the deadline is a couple of months before you fly. It has been known for people to fundraise to pay for their DILP but none of the lovely Ladies in Andhupura did but we were told by the DILP unit lead to expect to pay around £3000 through an Agency so fund raising may be a very good option.

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Our ECG machine – complete with metal suction cups

Since I organized mine independently it cost a lot less, around £1500 for flights, accommodation, visa’s, insurance and the cost of living whilst I’m here. Although recommending someone to go it alone abroad is much like recommending someone to do a home birth without alerting a midwife. It can be super rewarding and great but if something goes wrong – it can be really disastrous.

Work the World have been really wonderful with all the students who worked with them, really helpful and easy to contact which made the whole process very straightforward and stress-free. Also the students (who come from all over and include OTs and Medics) with Work the World all stay near to eachother which is nice to have a little support hub of people all going through the same thing.

People were curious about time off and whether or not we have the ability to actually experience the country and the culture whilst working 37.5 hours a week. We were unanimous in our answer of YES!! 7.5 hours a day with early starts does mean it’s not advisable to be staying up late every night having cocktails at a beach bar but there is always the weekends for that!

I’ve been working 8 hour shifts (excl. breaks) 7-3.30 each day which leaves me a big chunk of the afternoon to do as I please. With a coupe of 12 hour night shifts thrown in I’m finishing placement in 6 weeks (30 days) as opposed to the 7 weeks (33 working days excl. bank holidays) allocated by the university. This means I’ll have a week at the end of my placement exclusively for free time.

I’m lucky enough to be able to stay on for a while after placement is done to travel around the island a bit and holiday with my family and boyfriend which is a really nice goal to aim for when I’m missing home.

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“Difficulty walking, slurring speech, brain stem stroke”

The language barrier can be frustrating at times but all medical terms are spoken and written in English so you can spot quite easily what each case is about. Most of the Nurses I’ve encountered have a good grasp of English so if you ask questions, they will try their hardest to explain. The best thing about working abroad is the independence. You are relying on your Nursing instincts and knowledge, I’ve learnt a lot from my mentors and patients but I have taught them a lot as well. I’ve introduced a new standardized handover tool, which has been saving hours of staff time. I’ve been screenshot-ing and explaining tools such as the Bristol Stool Chart and the SBAR in an effort in increase the use of evidence based assessment tools. The staff are really keen to learn as am I which makes for a really engaging and exciting atmosphere in the ward.

Again any more questions you have about working abroad, working independently or the DILP in general please do comment on our Facebook page or email us at enhancingplacement@gmail.com

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