Learning Curve

Your first placement as a student nurse is meant to give a taster of what your career could be. It’s designed to inspire, help you find your feet and learn some of the basic skills. So what happens if that’s not the case?

There is a known fact amongst student nurses/midwives that everybody has a bad placement, whether that means it’s too intense, not what you expected, or not as exciting as you hoped.

For me, it was very much not what I expected. I was placed on an outpatients’ department. It was incredibly diverse in that I worked alongside many different healthcare professionals and was able to observe a wide range of clinics- which all helped my A&P knowledge a lot! But apart from that, I felt a bit shortchanged. Whilst all my colleagues and friends were off being thrown in at the deep end, I was endlessly calling patients in and observing doctors’ clinics. This wasn’t exactly the way I saw my first experience as a student nurse panning out, and I felt completely hopeless. Fellow students and staff would give me a look of sympathy and tell me it gets better when I told them where I was. I would dread going there, because I wasn’t being challenged. I felt that my time wasn’t being spent in the best way possible.

The best thing to do in a situation like this is to make the most of it. It’s hard, I know. You think “what could I possibly get out of this” but you’d be surprised! A placement like this is a great chance to brush up your knowledge, and it’s fabulous for reflective accounts! I have spent countless hours observing every moment in a consultation, thinking about what went well, what could have been better, and how I could improve that when I am put in a similar situation. You’ll also spend a lot of time talking to patients, which can make all the difference to them. A memorable patient for me was a young woman with a rather excitable young child came into the clinic. I played with the child (using only a curtain, which I’m quite proud of) whilst she discussed her medical problem. When she left, she thanked me so graciously that I knew I’d done her a huge favour. Its moments like that I have to remember that nursing isn’t all exciting stuff and clinical skills. Sometimes it’s about those moments when you make someone’s life just a little bit easier.

 

Note: if you ever feel unsure about your placement, no matter what the problem, talk to somebody! Whether that be your mentor, PEF, friend, AA or another member of staff. Someone can help.

Advertisements